Twisting The Night Away


by Meg Keene, Editor-In-Chief

Twisting The Night Away | A Practical WeddingThis is one of my all time favorite dresses. The thing I love the most about this wedding is the dress, it’s stylish, lovely and unique (and it has a deep V in the back, in the center picture, I love that the most). To top it all off it was made by a friend of the bride, which makes it personal too.

In the end, if I end up having a short wedding dress, it may be this series of pictures that helped me make the final decision. If there is one thing I want to do at my wedding it’s DANCE (and I want everyone else to be dancing too). At a party I like any kind of music I can dance to: klezmer, R&B;, swing, soul, country, rock. I’ve started to realize that most wedding dresses are not made with serious dancing in mind. Maybe a teary eyed slow dance, but not the hora, the jitterbug, the twist, and the electric slide.

What do you guys think? Can you make a long (non poofy) dress work for dancing? Is short the way to go? What crazy tests should I be doing at bridal salons? (I’m getting a dress made of course, but testing samples at bridal salons.) Thank goodness I ruled out a train already!

Photos via Martha.

Meg Keene

Meg is the Founder and EIC of APW. Her first book, A Practical Wedding: Creative Solutions for Planning a Beautiful, Affordable, and Meaningful Celebration, was published in January 2012, and has been a top three bestseller on the wedding bookshelf ever since. Meg has her BFA in Drama from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her husband and son.

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  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06290864014993900467 Nikki

    I love the dress in the photo and the full skirt is perfect for showing off the movement of all the dancing you plan on doing. I did wear a long dress (not dragging on the floor, but you could basically just see my ankles) that invovled ruffles down the length of it in three four places, and this also gave a great sense of movement. It was also made of very light fabric, which helped me feel completely free. I did some swing for sure, and I spent the entire night on the dance floor…. I barely saw my new wife!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12095127115348973647 Jessamyn Harris

    love it!
    by the way, I have a dressmaker recommendation, http://www.anneventresco.com/ . She is very affordable and creates really lovely work, based on the designs you bring her. Sadly her portfolio photos aren’t amazing (mostly because it seems that her web designer scanned the photos in kind of yuckily) but the work of hers that I’ve seen has been top notch!

  • Peonies and Polaroids

    This dress is fab, I love how 50s style full skirts look on the dance floor!

    Jenny Packhams dresses (I’ve just posted some on my blog) are more suitable for dancing than most long dresses, they’re very floaty and non-restrictive. In fact I think the long dress in the picture you posted from Heather Waraksa might have been a Jenny Packham dress.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10223959906901139940 sstennett

    I had a slim trumpet/sheath dress that was long. I had seamstress make a detachable organza train to go with it. I danced well in it. It was far more comfy than those huge heavy gowns would be.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/09526722516550185150 Meg

    P&P;: Thank you! I’m totally looking into her.
    Nikki: You better dance like that at my wedding!
    Jessamyn: This is really helpful. I was already in touch with her, but I hadn’t followed up b/c I just wasn’t sure, so that is great to hear.
    sstennett: if I go long i already know I’m doing a trumpet sheath, so I love hearing that its danceable.

  • Anonymous

    Just thought I’d chime in, because I had my dress made and realized at the last minute (a week before the wedding) that I stupidly had NOT taken into consideration the fact that I really wanted to dance and party at my wedding, and that the dress I had designed (yes, I only have myself to blame) would not work for that. I STRONGLY recommend trying on tons of ready made dresses before having something made. The dress I ended up wearing was a sample I got for $500, that I found only a few days before leaving town for the wedding. It was simple and elegant in a lightweight shantung. It actually was really fun to pick up and swish the long skirt in an irreverent kind of way, so I don’t think you need a short dress to have a great time (I’m pretty petite, so was worried that a ballerina length would shorten me more). The added bonus is that I didn’t end up worrying about the dress at all…food, people’s sweaty handy, etc…Maybe some people could be nonchalant about a dress that cost thousands of dollars, but I don’t think I could.

  • shlobiwan

    I’ve been looking at your site for a couple of months now, since my partner and I decided to go out and get engaged.

    And I have to say, I think the thing that worries me the most is the wedding dress. I am not restricting myself to any colour or shape of dress, and the only detail that I think (therefore and not set on) I’ve worked out for myself is that I don’t want a train.

    Everything else has is slowly working its way through the decision process and I think I’ve given myself way too many options.

    I have plenty of time to decide (we’re two years away), but am scared that I will never know. Beyond that, I don’t know where to even start! I don’t know the first thing about slips or sheaths or crinoline or anything. I see comments and descriptions of dresses and I don’t even know what they mean!