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Sponsored Post: A Beautiful Day Photography, Seattle Photojournalism


Sponsored Post: A Beautiful Day Photography, Seattle Photojournalism | A Practical Wedding

Today I get to write about long-time sponsor A Beautiful Day Photography out of Seattle. I think the best sum up I can give of Daniel, the photographer himself, is that he’s the real deal. As wedding photography gets trendier and trendier you hear things thrown around like, “I’m a wedding photojournalist,” and you see endless images edited with the hottest filter of the moment, sun flares, and over saturated colors. I don’t have to tell you, because you know. You know the, “Huh, so when I look PAST the filters and the sun flares and the hip brides… what do I really think?”

Sponsored Post: A Beautiful Day Photography, Seattle Photojournalism | A Practical Wedding

Not with A Beautiful Day Photography, that’s for sure. Look at the pictures and you know, “Oh, he’s got it. He shoots what’s really there. He really sees you.” And that’s what you want. It’s that simple and that complicated.

Sponsored Post: A Beautiful Day Photography, Seattle Photojournalism | A Practical Wedding

Daniel is not just a wedding photojournalist, he’s an *actual* photojournalist. He spent much of his career shooting sports, fashion, and also shooting in war zones. He has a Pulitzer Prize. I’m not kidding. And now you can hire him to shoot your wedding, which is sort of mind boggling.

Sponsored Post: A Beautiful Day Photography, Seattle Photojournalism | A Practical Wedding

He says, “I have made the transition from covering hard news to weddings, documenting them in the same way as my editorial stories. Now instead of getting shot at in conflict zones, I get to photograph joyful celebrations of love, family and friends. (The food is always better too).”

Sponsored Post: A Beautiful Day Photography, Seattle Photojournalism | A Practical Wedding

He shoots in both digital and film, and his signature is these amazing huge group portraits taken on a large format black and white film panoramic camera, and includes 12″ x 36″ print with every package. Now, before my wedding I looked at these pictures and thought, “Oh, that’s cool.” But after? Yeah, guys, you want this, you really really do. Daniel told me, “It is the one picture people love to have framed and hanging on their wall. It shows everyone who attended the wedding and 5 -10 years from now it will be more highly valued than any other picture shot that day.”

Sponsored Post: A Beautiful Day Photography, Seattle Photojournalism | A Practical Wedding

And he’s right. You know why? In blog land we spend a lot of time focusing on wedding pictures as art (and they are that, just look at the pictures in this post). But wedding pictures are more than that. They are documentation. They become part of our collective history. The picture of my grandparents wedding that we have on our bookshelf, right where you see it when you walk in? I don’t love it because it’s art, I love it because it’s a documentation of history, of people I loved. And that’s what you get with A Beautiful Day Photography, and what’s more important than that?

Oh, and PS: He photographed Conan O’Brien’s wedding. I’m not kidding. So, um, what are you waiting for Seattle & West Coast ladies?

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  • tupelohoney

    Every time I saw the ad on the side bar I kept saying, “MAN, that guy looks like Conan O’Brien.”… um, because it is! That’s fantastic!

    • http://agorillalibrarian.blogspot.com/ Mejane

      DUDE. Me too! So very awesome.

      • http://www.christytylerphotography.blogspot.com Christy

        HA ha – me tooooooo! That’s too funny. :)

  • ddayporter

    ohmanohman I definitely wish I had that big group photo of everyone at the wedding. my sister even suggested it when we were doing a walk-through the day before and I was like ARE you insane? I am not trying to corral 80 people out here to get into some cheesy group photo. now I know we could have done it, and I so wish we had.

    • http://suburbaliciousliving.blogspot.com/ Lauren

      Me too, DDay- it’s maybe my only regret from the wedding day that I don’t have everyone in a shot, EVEN if they would have been cranky about doing it. Oh well.

    • Margaret M.

      Me too, though I try very hard not to harbor any regrets about my wedding, I would have loved a huge group photo. My grandma and grandpa always had those kinds of portraits, big panoramic shots, hanging in their foyer. I always loved them. Maybe I can talk my brother into it when he gets married…

    • Vmed

      Dday,

      My family ALWAYS does this (and endless permutations of all the cousins now all the male cousins now all the female cousins without the babies now with the babies now all the aunts now all– you get it) and there are 60 people on my mother’s side alone.

      You are TOTALLY right to think it is insane to move that many people, and it is annoying, especially when everyone and their brother brought their own digital camera and all permutations must be taken on each camera. (are you kidding me)

      So don’t feel bad, please don’t feel bad for having that reaction, it’s perfectly reasonable.

      I may ban exogenous cameras at my own wedding for this very reason. Certainly for the ceremony.

      But I guess if the photographer just took the single shot of everyone (a totally inclusive everybody there) that would be a different (much more pleasant) story.

      In fact, what a brilliant solution. I will do that.

      • ddayporter

        haha yeah I would only have allowed the photog to get the shot, none of this “oh use my camera!” business. there was even a balcony where the photog could have set up and we would all have been on the ground below. seemed insane to get everyone to go outside and stand half in the street for it… but now I think it totally could have been done. I especially like the idea of saying “we’re gonna feed you but not till you do this one thing!”

    • meg

      Make sure they have a ladder!! Our venue didn’t have one, so it’s hard to see everyone in our group shot. But, there were about 110 people, so, tricky.

      • Jennifer

        A colleague has a great group shot from her wedding – she was married in her parents’ backyard and the photographer took it from an upstairs window, which worked brilliantly. I was toying with the idea of asking our photographer to take a picture of everyone from the balcony in the chapel, while they’re still in the pews, which would eliminate the herding issue, but I can’t think of a way to do this (without having just the backs of everyone’s heads) without interrupting the ceremony, and they probably still would all be too spread out for it to look right. So, we’re probably not going to have an Everybody shot for purely logistical reasons. But having the photographer head upstairs could be a great option for people with multi-level venues.

        • meg

          JUST HERD THEM. It’s worth it, and there is no way around it. We herded everyone for ours. We said we’d feed them, but only after they took this picture. It was annoying, but not that annoying and totally worth it.

  • Meg

    I just have to give Daniel a shout out. I am so excited to see him featured. My husband and I found him on APW and he shot our wedding a few weeks ago. He is gracious, fantastic to work with, and such a phenomenal photographer. His whole family is great! He shot our wedding on his birthday! I just can’t say enough great things about him. I cannot WAIT to see our group shot in a few weeks when we get our photos back. Hire Daniel!

    • meg

      Send me PICTURES lady!!

      • Meg

        I most definitely will!