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DIY Wedding Flowers: 10 Simple Tips That Will Save You a Meltdown


With the secret about refrigerating flowers

by Meg Keene, CEO & Editor-In-Chief

APWPlanner

If you’re contemplating DIY wedding flowers, it’s important to think about what, exactly, you’re taking on. If you just want to DIY your bouquets, here is a tutorial, go knock it out of the park. But if you’re thinking you’re going to DIY all of your wedding flowers, now is the moment to take a timeout and contemplate the scope of the entire endeavor.

View More: http://allisonandres.pass.us/apw-flower-day

Because for real, putting together a centerpiece isn’t actually all that hard. But the whole picture looks more like this: figuring out your design, buying vases and floral supplies, practicing, buying your wedding flowers right before the wedding, keeping them alive, putting centerpieces together, and having enough space in a vehicle to transport them to the venue. All together it’s a project. It’s a totally doable project (I did it for our wedding), but if you take it on, either minimize it (bouquets only), or make it one of your only major projects.

To help make your DIY florals as successfully as possible (fewer dead flowers, fewer tears), Natalie Marvin, owner of Belle Flower, and Jessica Dixon, owner of The Petal Company, shared their best tips and tricks for making your florals awesome and painless.

1. come up with designs in advance

Getting in the room with pretty flowers doesn’t mean that inspiration will suddenly strike or that you’ll have any clue how to construct a centerpiece or a bouquet. This is the time to scour the Internet for inspiration pictures of projects you think you could actually create, and ideally you should find tutorials for them (we’ve got a bunch right here). Also, spend some serious time with tutorials on how to put together a bouquet. Then get some flowers from the grocery store and practice.

2. don’t get too technical

You know all those amazing, lush, complex centerpieces you’ve seen on Pinterest? I say this with great love, but you probably can’t have those if you’re DIYing. You want to pick a design with one or two flowers, and make sure you have a good idea of how to construct it. Not just once, but upward of ten times.

3. buy your vases

Buying vases can work one of two ways: you can figure out what your concept is and find vases to match, or you can find vases that seem workable and figure out what flowers to put in them. Regardless, be aware of scale. Something that seems huge to you at home may well be dwarfed by a large round table. Great sources for vases are flower markets, craft stores, thrift stores, big-box stores, and Amazon. You can always do some crafting to make your vases cooler (hello, spray paint), but you really don’t have to.

4. buy floral supplies

You’ll want to pre-buy your supplies, which you can easily do online. You’ll probably want floral scissors, floral tape, pins (for your bouquets as well as any corsages), floral foam (as needed), and floral wire (if you’re doing boutonnières and corsages). Don’t forget ribbon to wrap the bouquets.

5. pick hardy flowers

When doing it yourself, you don’t want to risk your money on flowers that die if not treated exactly right or that only last twenty-four hours. Research which flowers will last longer (here’s a good place to start), and use those blooms. When you get the flowers, put them directly into clean water and remove leaves and foliage below the water line. Store them in a cool, shady place.

6. be aware of how the flowers may arrive

If you’re ordering from a wholesale flower company, make sure you know what state the flowers will arrive in. Often they will be delivered a few days early, still closed, and you need to keep them alive while they bloom. Allow time for that, and make sure someone is going to be in charge of keeping them fresh.

7. arrange for help

Unless you’re only doing simple bouquets, you’re going to need several sets of hands to put the flowers together. Set up a time (probably the day before the wedding) to do the arranging. Remember to have pictures on hand of what the final product is supposed to look like and set up a sample or two to copy. Once all the flowers are done, you may want to do a little quality control to make sure they look the way they’re supposed to. (Granny’s idea of hip centerpieces may be slightly different from yours.)

8. Realistic timelines

  • Centerpieces can be created two days out. Plan for two to three hours for fifteen centerpieces, with two people working.
  • Bouquets should be made the day before. Allowing for inexperience, allot forty-five minutes to an hour for a bridal bouquet, and about half that time for each attendant bouquet.
  • Boutonnières and corsages are tricky little things and have to be made the day before or the day-of to stay alive. Allow two hours for a handful of them, or consider skipping them all together. (Here is a Boutonnière tutorial and a corsage tutorial, for the determined among you.)

9. don’t refrigerate your flowers

I know, what? But as it turns out, the humidity and temperature of a normal refrigerator is different from that of a floral fridge, and it will dry out your flowers and kill them. Store your flowers in a cool and shady place, and you’ll be fine.

10. arrange for transportation

Unless you’re one of those lucky people with nearly unlimited access to your venue (maybe it’s your house?), chances are good that you’re going to have to prep your flowers in a different location and transport them to the venue. Transporting centerpieces takes space (you can’t stack them) and careful packing. One option is to use opaque vases and create your centerpieces in floral foam, so they’ll stay in one piece even if they fall over. Another option is to empty the water from the vases, and pack things together compactly so nothing gets knocked around too badly. Regardless, plan in advance for a friend or loved one with truck or van space to transport the flowers.

(And a bonus tip: Remember cleanup. Have brooms.)

For those of you who tackled DIY wedding flowers, what advice do you have? What would you have done differently, and what did you do just right?

A Practical Wedding Planner

This post was excerpted from the #APWPlanner. For more useful advice like this, get your #APWPlanner at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, IndieBound, or on iTunes.

Meg Keene

Meg is the Founder and EIC of APW. She has written two best selling wedding books: A Practical Wedding and A Practical Wedding Planner. Meg has her BFA in Drama from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. She lives in Oakland, CA with her husband and two children. For more than you ever wanted to know about Meg, you can visit MegKeene.com.

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  • AP

    YES to #1. Have a design and a plan in mind, and do a trial run if you don’t know what you’re doing. DON’T just order a ton of loose flowers and randomly sized vases, shove a few of your family members into a room the day before the wedding (during the rehearsal dinner) and say, “I don’t care, just make them look nice.” (True story.)

    • Emily

      So glad to know I am not the only one!

    • sage

      Ugh yes. For my sister’s wedding, we had access to the venue the day before. We all went into the space after carrying in boxes of loose flowers, vases, fruit, tulle, candles, glass bricks, baskets, cakestands, beads, paper, etc. I was then told that I was “in charge of decorating” and my sister gave me this weird summary of a “vision” she had for the space. And everyone started asking me what to do. It was sort of a nightmare, but worked out OK in the end. And that’s when I decided that whenever I get married absolutely NOTHING will be DIY.

  • Danielle

    Husband and one of his dads did the flowers for our wedding. What helped?

    1) Dad used to run a flower shop and husband used to work there. So they had professional experience.

    2) IDNGAF about the flowers. My idea was like: “Flowers are nice. Let’s have some.” Sure, maybe earlier in the planning process (or more honestly, before being engaged, when a wedding was something I might have some day in the future, not a real thing I was planning) I had some preferences, like “Peonies are nice” or “I like gardenias.” A month or two out? Hell no. With various family drama, money issues, health issues, a tight timeline, starting a new job…. just, no. I could not muster the energy for flowers.

    3) We like plants and I like collecting old glass jars, so we already had a free/cheap collection of containers and plant clippings, which we ended up interspersing with the flowers in our centerpieces. I felt really good about having some live plants at our wedding :) Please note, this did not take much additional energy for me bc it’s something I already enjoyed doing.

    4) Husband and his dad went to the grocery store the day before and bought about $60 worth of whatever flowers were available, in somewhat color-coordinated tones. (Thank you, gay father-in-law!) They set them up in our kitchen while I got my nails done with my mom.

    • I also DNGAF about flowers and it was awesome. I wasn’t planning on having any, but we happened upon a field of wildflowers the day before the wedding and my family turned them into corsages and a bouquet while I was busy with other prep. I had no instructions for them and no idea of what they’ll come up with, but I did provide a stash of craft supplies — safety pins, ribbons, thread. I think they had fun.

  • It’s looking like our flowers are going to be our big DIY project. I’ve been trying to compare costs of real vs. fake flowers and have seen a lot of good reviews about Afloral. Has anyone here used them or seen their flowers in person? Based off the pictures, most of the their flowers look remarkably real and it would give us the flexibility to make things further in advance. On the other hand, I’m adamantly opposed to using fake flowers if they are going to look obviously fake (think most of the florals at Michaels or other chain craft stores). Also, what they heck are we going to do with a bunch of fake flowers after the wedding? I could always do the bouquets with fake flowers for durability and the centerpieces with fresh ones. The flowers I’m looking to use are ferns, hop vine, ranunculus, anemone and hypericum berries and our wedding is memorial day weekend. Any advice re: good wholesale places or Afloral? Or general input based off your experience?

    • I Don’t Knowww, Margo!

      I hadn’t heard of Afloral, but I’m loving what I’m seeing!

      My plan is to use Michael’s or Joann’s coupons to slowly buy fake flowers for my bouquet. I like the look of real flowers better, but I also love the idea of being able to save my bouquet.

      Also, I want to see pictures of what you end up with- that combo sounds lovely!

      • Erica G

        Afloral has much nicer flowers, I love them! I am planning to do real flowers for the bouquets and ordering from afloral for the centerpieces!

    • Erica G

      I honestly would do it the other way around, real flowers for the bouquets because they are easier to arrange and transport, faux for the centerpieces. Afloral and Save-on-Crafts are my two favorites for high quality faux flowers!

  • I Don’t Knowww, Margo!

    This is so helpful! My grand idea for wedding flowers is to keep collecting milk bottles as I use them (with the bonus of getting to drink delicious local dairy milk) and then hit up Trader Joe’s a couple days before to buy up a bunch of the $3.99-5.99 bouquets. I’ll do some trial runs this summer, but I think the narrow neck of the milk bottles will help the bouquets look fuller.
    My fiance also suggested that we skip the vegetable garden this year, since critters got away with most of our bounty the past few years, and instead plant whatever kind of flowers we’d like for the wedding. So, my plan for the next few months is to figure out what will be flowering in early September and work backwards, and then just supplement whatever we can grow with Trader Joe’s flowers.

    • Keri

      I have heard that you can order from Trader Joe’s ahead of time – even if you just let them know you’re going to want X number of mixed packages and they’ll get extra for you. I haven’t done it, but I’ve heard good things!

  • Alexandra

    A friend of mine did all the flowers and all the decorating. She did a bang-up job with a couple of volunteers. I told her to use local stuff and make everything as simple as possible, and it all turned out incredible for hardly any money. We do live in Hawaii, so she used all tropicals that came from people’s backyards.

    The more I think about it, the more I need to buy that friend dinner (again). I don’t think she got much sleep the night before the wedding.

    It helped that our centerpieces were monsterra leaves (giant decorative ferns that grow everywhere) and pineapples, with a truckload of cut plumerias.

    • zedabee

      Sounds beautiful! And you are so lucky to have such a generous friend. Please do buy her dinner (again) if you can, she will feel so appreciated for all the hard work it sounds like she put in :)

  • Sara

    Not having very many flowers definitely made the DIY part easier. My wife and I had bouquets as did our maid of honor and flower girl. Our best man(her cousin) has severe allergies so he preferred not having a boutonnière which we were fine with. He had a pocket square in our colors instead. The bridal bouquets were Pink and Purple Billy Balls with little white poms as filler. The maid of honor and flower girl had small bouquets of white poms. All of our flowers were from fifty flowers.com and we put them together the day before. There were no floral centerpieces so it took 3 of us 2.5 hours to make 4 bouquets.

  • CBC

    I know so little about flowers it’s comical, and we DIY’d, so YES to all of the above. Especially arranging for help. We (me, mom, bridesmaids, aunts) did the flowers the morning of the wedding, and not only was it super effective and quick, spending my wedding day morning eating bagels and laughing hysterically with the women I love was one of my favorite memories from the day. The only thing I did the day before was crafting small paper flowers for the arrangements and boutonnière (out of our past boarding passes from our 3-year-long long distance relationship). I do wish I had done 1 or 2 practice bouquets for myself, because I think the flowers could have been placed in a more strategic way, but as was our motto through all of wedding planning (and life)- qué será será! For the tables, we collected mismatched glass bottles of various sizes over a few months, and stuck a few on each table with assorted flowers in each. Add some light confetti and some salt water taffy, and voila! DIY centerpieves, of which none looked the same. We did those the morning of as well, with the help of the groom and the aunts. All of the flowers turned out great- people kept asking me for the name of my florist and I was like, Hi. I felt pretty strongly about DIY-ing this part of the wedding, and my heart and wallet are so happy we did.

    • nycgirl6

      I love this! I also have zero experience with flowers but am DIYing and going for the same general idea- mismatched vases and bottles, a couple flowers in each, a few on each table with a couple LED candles. Glad to hear it worked out well for you!

      • Kelly

        We went this route and it turned out great! Ordered a couple buckets of wildflowers from a flower farm (I just asked for an assortment of whatever would look good as sprigs or single flowers) for about $100. Cutting all the little sprigs and arranging the bottles was still a little time consuming, but it was super easy and took relatively little thought. We also used recycled wine bottles for water and glass tea lights with little pebbles in the bottom, so the tables had lots of glass of varying heights and pops of color. The finished product felt really light and unfussy, which is what we were going for with our brunch state park wedding. Here’s a picture of our “sweetheart” table (those wooden doors were opened up during the reception).

        • nycgirl6

          Looks awesome!

        • Lizzie

          oh my gosh, those lanky stems in the glass on the left – LOVE

  • Sara P

    We did our own flowers, and it was really fun (made a huge mess in the house, but whatever). Things that helped:

    1) This APW tutorial: http://apracticalwedding.com/2012/05/how-to-make-a-simple-colorful-tablescape/ – we skipped the candles, the runner, and the placecards. Long rectangular tables were also cheaper and fit under the tent we got better, so that worked out really well, too.

    2) Having the wedding at home – otherwise setting up the flowers at the venue is a good way to do it, if you can (did that for a friend’s wedding last fall). They’re easier to transport before they’re arranged.

    3) We did them the day of – a friend of mine and I went to get them from the farmer’s market (I had pre-ordered from a really awesome lady at the market and she had them in buckets of water ready to go), brought them home and just started plunking them in vases. (I didn’t get my makeup or my hair done and therefore had time for this, a major consideration.)

    4) My mother loves thrift stores and bought a bajillion vases of varying sizes and brought them up. It helped to have more than we needed – not all vases are easy to arrange flowers in (with the plunk method).

    5) Lots of hands – I think there were 5 or 6 of us? It really helps to have a couple people on bouquets. And a friend that is really good at corsages/boutonnieres, if those are things you want.

    Photo evidence (I loved how it turned out):

    • Keri

      pretty!

    • Lizzie

      love these!

  • Flowers!

    We had a florist do bouquets and boutonnieres, an arrangement for the altar at the church, and low key arrangements for our head table. We did DIY for the rest of the church (a dozen single flower “arrangements”) and small, casual arrangements for the rest of the tables for the reception (tiny glass vases and jars with a few flowers in each, including large, bold single stem flowers cut short). That sounds simple, but it still took much of our collective DIY effort and it definitely had a casual, “we made this” look. Our goal was to use as much locally grown material as possible, though, and we were happy with the result. But for those who want a “professional” look, be prepared to spend a lot of time and a fair amount of money as well.

  • LydiaB

    For me, the benefits of making my own bouquet really were the cost, it was SO MUCH cheaper than buying them ready made.

    The downside was the time it took, at least 2 hours of solid, tiring work to make the 2 bouquets. Both very worth it but wish I had known the time it would take in advance so that I could have scheduled in to start earlier as I had to rush to get ready for the rehearsal dinner and meeting with the photographer!

    Gallery attached of the flowers from market to wedding day! http://imgur.com/a/JwXZf

    • Sara P

      Your bouquet was AMAZING.

    • nycgirl6

      I feel like I’ve seen that last picture of you and your husband somewhere… did your wedding get featured on APW? You guys look amazing! And so do the flowers!

    • Her Lindsayship

      SO beautiful!! Thanks for sharing the gallery!

    • Cat

      K sorry, just had to chime in months after the fact to say that your wedding looks AWESOME, as did your flowers!!! So jealous of what looks like a fun, relaxed wedding day in Florence (as opposed to the less-than-fun crap lots of us actually go through lol). All the best! :) xx

      • LydiaB

        Thank you! That’s brightened up my afternoon! Xxxx

  • Keeks

    Doing the flowers myself was one of my favorite parts of the wedding. I did it all myself – 13 centerpieces, 3 bouquets, 2 nosegays, 15 boutonnieres, and my flower crown. Here’s a picture of my bouquet: http://imgur.com/1BV8MaF

    Things that helped me:
    1. Dry runs with grocery store flowers. I practiced composition and technique, and figured out how long it would take to make everything.
    2. Having just a loose color scheme for the entire wedding, but being knowledgeable about flowers that I liked & would be in season. I used this wedding for inspiration and reference: http://willfrolicforfood.com/2014/12/byrd-wedding-vibes-part-1.html
    3. Giving up on clear vases – I spray painted them black and used floral foam. So much easier to arrange and I didn’t have to worry about water leaking out.
    4. Having a really solid plan and spreading the work out over the wedding week. Wednesday – picked up the flowers and did all the prep work like removing leaves. Thursday – made all the centerpieces & some of the bouquets. Friday – made the boutonnieres, my bouquet and flower crown, and pack for transport. My wedding was on a Saturday morning, so the flowers didn’t have to last so long. :) I did all my work and kept everything in the basement where it was cool & dark.

    Boutonnieres were surprisingly easy. I made all 15 in about 60 minutes. My bouquet was the most difficult and took me about an hour to make. All in all, I spent abut $300 on all materials & flowers – and I had a ton of leftovers that I had to throw away (that broke my heart!). My only regrets were that I didn’t make my bouquet bigger, and my floral crown didn’t go all the way around.

  • Keri

    My plan is ordering flowers from Sam’s club, stopping on the way up to the venue on friday, loading them into fiance’s cube of a car, assemble with friends and fam in the house we’re staying in on site that afternoon, using the boxes and boxes of empty, various sized canning jars that need to be cleared out of my dad’s cousin’s house anyway for vases, and then enlist a few on-site guests to carry them next door the next day. In the summer, when I’m done with classes and everyone else is working and I’m feeling bored and crafty, I’ll practice making boquets and if I like it, I’ll make them for me and the two bridesmaids, and if I don’t, I’ll order some. I helped put together the flowers on the tables for my friend’s wedding at the last minute, and I thought it was fun. Why not!

  • dk1988

    To keep things manageable, I decided to DIY the flowers for the ceremony aisles and for the reception tables for our 40 person wedding, but to have a professional florist do the bouquets. It was a great way to save some money while at the same time avoiding the pressure of making the perfect bouquets (which for some reason I find much more intimidating than centerpieces!).

  • ART

    We DIY’ed ours from a mail-order vendor (maybe Blooms by the Box?). It worked out well, but our roses came a day late due to severe weather somewhere along their route. Made me nervous, but we had ordered them for Thursday before our Saturday wedding so it worked out. We kept it extremely simple: orange roses, baby’s breath, greens. I was afraid with the b.b. it might look dated but it was fantastic (and cheap!) We bought our vases/containers at thrift stores because I wanted old silver teapots and stuff (pretty, but time consuming…) but it recently occurred to me that if you work in a large office or know people who do – have someone scour the kitchen-y areas for vases from people getting arrangements delivered for birthdays and things. At my office people tend to wash them and then forget about them and there are usually five or six in the random junk cabinet above the fridge or under the sink. If you’re OK with an eclectic mix of shapes, that could be a good way to score a bunch for free.

  • Lizzie

    No joke, my big to-do item for tonight is “decide whether to DIY flowers or not” – thank you for this article (and I eagerly await the comments)!

  • Rose

    We did our own flowers. There were a lot of things that were in our favor; the reception was at my parent’s house, so we didn’t have transport issues, and all the time we wanted. Ours were a combination of some that my mom grew, some from Blooms by the Box (which turned out to be in mixed condition, when they arrived), a bouquet of orange roses from the grocery store because I really wanted some and Blooms by the Box couldn’t ship them that week, and two big buckets from a local dahlia farm.

    We had two bridal bouquets, and flower crowns for each of us and some of the other bridesmaids-type people who were there. Then corsages/bouts, and centerpieces. The only thing I’d really practiced was the bouquet and the crowns; the main plan for the centerpieces was the same APW tutorial that one or two other people have already linked to, with the recycled bottles with a few flowers in each.

    TBH, I think the reason it worked for us, despite a lack of expert knowledge, was that we had a lot of help, and didn’t much care about the details. We basically handed the bottles and all of the flowers that were left over to some friends and asked them to make arrangements, and it worked really well. They did a beautiful job. But if I’d had a vision of what I wanted, or if I’d wanted everything to look similar, it wouldn’t have worked out nearly so well. On the other hand, I’m also pretty convinced that you can’t go wrong with dahlias, especially if you’re just willing to work with the natural variation.

    And I absolutely can’t resist a few photos. Centerpieces just about to be put out, bouquets (mine is the one in front, hers is the one you can’t see as well), and flower crowns.

    • I love dahlias! They’re the only bloom I know I want, I don’t care what the rest are as long as they look pretty. Your flowers are lovely!

  • I’m thinking about doing my own flowers, mostly for budget reasons. Plus I live in LA and have the flower market as a resource. My main concern is setup – we are getting married in a hotel and only have access two hours beforehand. They’ve said that we may have to opportunity to get in earlier, depending on their schedule/other events, but we’re only guaranteed those two hours. I will have to be getting ready and taking pictures then, so I won’t be able to supervise set up. My mom, aunt, and cousins have volunteered to help with whole process, and I hired my day of coordinator with this plan in mind, but I feel like it might be hard to let go and trust them, even though I’ll be working on the arrangements with them the day before the wedding and I’m not envisioning anything too complicated. I just can’t decide if it’s worth the stress! If I knew we could set up the venue the morning of the wedding rather than just two hours before, I wouldn’t be worried about it at all, argh.

    • KPM

      If the flowers are arranged in advance, it isn’t that much different than a florist knowing where to set things up appropriately. Your day of coordinator should be able to handle it if given instructions.

  • Penny7b

    We had a cocktail reception, so no centrepieces needed. We did bouquets and boutonnieres only. Generally I’m glad I did it (we paid about 1/4 the price I’d have paid for a cheap professional job that I wouldn’t have liked as much), but there are a few things I’ll say abut the experience.

    • KPM

      This is gorgeous!

  • Alex

    Late to the party, but I (plus mom+girlfriends) DIY’d the flowers for my+husband’s wedding last March. I ordered a ton of flowers from fiftyflowers.com (who I HIGHLY recommend!) and made my bouquet, 8-10 boutennaires and about 5 corsages, 8 really large arrangements in tall vases about about 40 small frappucino bottle-sized arrangements (my dad has a bad habit so he saved the bottles for a few months, I spray painted them spring colors and then used those bottles + shorter stumpier bottles to mix up the height differences also spray painted). The small vases we ran down our long tables and larger arrangements were for food tables/bar/guest book/entry way. Make sure you think about timing and have a bunch of 5 gallon buckets and be prepared to switch out water and keep those flowers healthy :) The great thing about small arrangements is they take about 8 seconds to cut the stems to the right height and they’re all mismatched anyways. One hydrangea in a short vase, done. One tulip, two billy balls, and some mums, done. Etc. :) And since everyone else is doing it…. ;)

    OH! And think about what is in season – I absolutely adore peonies and dahlias, but I was getting married in March and peonies are very much a late May/June thing, and dahlias are even later in summer. But ranunculus are also adorable and they’re much more on the early spring side of things.

  • Erica G

    I will be doing my own flowers for my July 3rd wedding. Using Blooms-by-the-Box most likely for mine and my sisters bouquets and flower crowns. The centerpieces will most likely be faux flowers from Afloral.com or Save-on-crafts.com because they have the best quality faux flowers in my opinion. I want to be able to create the centerpieces well before the wedding, so faux is the way to go. It was very important to me to have a fresh bouquet, but the centerpieces didn’t matter as much to me. The left over flowers are going to be used to do a DIY flower crown table at our welcome party! :D

  • Marie

    I’m DIYing my own centerpieces but they will be potted succulents and cacti instead of flowers. I’m hoping this will allow me to complete the centerpieces way ahead of time and not have to worry about flowers dying. Has anyone done this before and have any tips?

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  • As a bride who DIYed her flowers I can say these tips are spot on! I would echo the importance of adequate transportation planning… we lost an arrangement due a hard right turn ;)

    A huge part of DIYing your wedding flower is the planning portion! I actually created a spreadsheet to keep track of how many flowers I needed and how many were allotted to each arrangement (http://diyblooms.com/free-flower-worksheet/).

    The only point I don’t necessarily agree with is the advice to only use 1-2 types of flowers. I think if you’re doing 20+ table arrangements, sure, keep it simple! But for the bouquets there aren’t as many to do and it’s more fun to have a variety and get creative I think :)

    I loved the APW DIY flowers tutorial as it was this site that gave me the initial idea to do my own flowers! I blogged about my DIY experience here: http://diyblooms.com/2015/07/09/my-diy-wedding-flower-story/

    And I’m sharing pictures since they are so fun! ;)

  • Jordan Hobbs

    Arrange for transportation! Key! Our creative has to let go and let the business side come out at times, because if the customer isn’t happy (and paying) it’s all for not in the end!

  • useful suggestion. I can do it by myself. I have bought many in Amazon for my wedding. They are also good

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