Why Are People Really So Mad about Hillary’s Emails?


We hate when women try

by Stephanie Kaloi, Content Manager

banneroption1hillary clinton in front of american flag

A few weeks ago, I sat down to watch a video from Vox that I’ve seen before—the one that’s made the rounds every week since it published in September 2016. The subject? Hillary Clinton’s greatest strength (which may well be her greatest weakness): she listens to people. I know it’s something we’ve been hearing a lot the past few months, and I also know that it’s something that’s easy to push to the side. After all, do Americans really care if a candidate for POTUS is a good listener?

In a system that was established by men to elect men who will serve men and male interests, listening is probably not high on the collection of traits to value. Speaking well? Able to make huge, glorious speeches that will get us riled up and ready to believe in hope, change, and tearing down Wall Street (shout out to Barack and Bernie)? Yeah, we’re generally here for that.

Well, at least, some of us are. I, for one, am always here for a listener. You know why? Listeners often turn into doers, and doers get shit done. And a whole lot of doers are women, and women don’t have time to play around:

HER EMAILS HAVE NEVER BEEN PART OF THE PROBLEM

I think it’s truly telling that Hillary’s emails have been a topic of discussion for essentially her entire campaign run. It’s wild to me because, save for very ardent supporters of Hillary’s opponent, I don’t think anyone really cares. You know what we’ve learned from the emails? Hillary rarely actually emailed anyone herself, for starters. Her campaign staffers didn’t like what she said about Nancy Reagan and AIDS anymore than you did. And, most importantly, absolutely nothing in the emails is revelatory: if you’ve been following Hillary for any length of time, you already know what the emails reveal. She doesn’t like to apologize; her staff writes her tweets. She’s progressive but willing to put that on pause, if need be, because she understands compromise is part of the political sphere.

In other words, she sounds like every other politician we’ve ever had the pleasure (or displeasure, depending) of voting for. My bad: she sounds like every other professional in the real world. Most of us know what the word “compromise” means and how to do it. Some of us have staff to whom we delegate tasks and trust to do their jobs because that’s why we hired them. Others of us have bosses who are cool as fuck and like to talk about Game of Thrones over work email. It’s fine. It’s life. Also? It’s not like she’s been out there sexually assaulting anyone while deleting those emails.

You know what I think when I read those emails? “Oh, huh, court dates. Oh look, she has a draft of an email she didn’t send. Okay, then.” I don’t know about you, but she just sounds like a person who is making sure her work is done, and done well. You know, like a lot of men.

“i’m not sexist, though”

Something has shifted this election season, and for some reason that obviously has nothing to do with systematic misogyny, people have decided that this is the election where the candidates just have to be 100 percent perfect. All of the sudden, our ethics and morals matter the most, and there has to be one candidate that meets every single last scrap of criteria for some of us to be so moved as to vote for that person, or we’ll all just throw our votes away and vote third party, because morals. Because ethics. Because reasons that, again, totally have absolutely nothing to do with sexism and misogyny, like, at all. I have women friends; I have a daughter; I’m married to a woman, okay? I’m not sexist.

To those (generally white, generally male, generally financially comfortable) people I have said, and will continue to say, it is truly something that you find yourself so comfortable in life that the idea of voting for what will help the most people is not as important as voting in a way that satisfies your terribly high, lofty, nearly-god-like morals. Wow. Go you.

The rest of us down here on Earth though, you know, the Black, the female, the disabled, the Jewish, the Latino and Hispanic, the LGBTQ, the Latinx, the Native American, the immigrant, the Muslim, the Hindu, the brown… we’ll just sit over here and wave at you while we’re being carted off to “camps.” I’m sure they’ll be lovely, and super cushy. I’ll try to send you a postcard of our smiling faces. You enjoy that all white, all male world you’ll be living in, boo.

Because, bro: I used to be here for Julian Assange, guys. I am a longtime viewer of Democracy Now!, and I remember when WikiLeaks became a thing. I remember the early, early days, when it was so wildly exciting. But then those rape allegations came out, and I soured on him. And then I learned that he is a self-avowed “foe of Hillary Clinton” and… stopped taking pretty much anything he leaks seriously. Because if you hate Hillary so much that you’d purposefully try to tank her campaign when she is running against an openly misogynistic, racist man who brags about sexually assaulting women (hmmm, Jules), then I’m not interested in anything you have to say (and especially when this election doesn’t even impact you, you Australian-born Ecuadorian embassy–living jerk).

#ImWithHer

I have been a committed Clinton supporter since the dawn of the race. For me, the choice was easy: I have always genuinely been jazzed about Clinton and her policies, plans, and experience. I am one of those people who bristles when accused of liking her because we share the same type of genitalia, and who will throw down (with my words) in an (online) fight in her defense, if need be. My reasons for supporting Hillary are long and varied, but ultimately come down to this: I believe she is the candidate who will do the most to advance my concerns, and more importantly, I believe she is the candidate who will do the most to advance the concerns of everyone else.

My concerns are easy for me to rattle off. I want it to be easier for people with disabilities and medical conditions to get permanent, comprehensive health insurance through Social Security, because right now that system is a little broken (and linked to your income—not everyone who applies needs money from the system, but they all, like my child, need health coverage). I want women to be able to decide what they do and do not do with their own bodies. I want all the civil liberties for all the people. I want more intense policy scrutiny, more rigorous training protocols. I want more outreach to boys and young men, and more education that is geared toward male nurturance. I want a candidate who will lift people in the United States out of deep poverty. I want people who want to live, work, and raise their families in the United States to be able to do so, and I want immigrants to be able to move here without having to perform political acrobatics or be terrified for their lives.

(I also fervently hope that one day, the United States will be a country that doesn’t march off to war at the drop of a hat [or quietly bomb countries when no one is looking]. I know that Hillary isn’t exactly on point with that last concern, but I also believe that electing Hillary will continue us on a path we were put on when we elected President Obama, and that having a Democrat in the White House gets us at least a tiny bit closer to a more peaceful nation. It might take a few more decades, but I think we can get there.)

However, those are just my concerns, and I’m not anymore important than anyone else. My child, my husband, my family are not more important than anyone else’s children, partners, or families. And I think that Hillary Clinton is the only candidate who gets that.

but back to that decision you have to make soon

When it comes to elections and voting, unless you’re married to me, I never assumed I know whom you’re going to vote for. And if we’re being honest, even being married to me isn’t surefire—my husband had to swear to me eighteen million times, up until the point where we each walked into a booth, that he was in fact planning to vote for Barack Obama and not Cynthia McKinney in 2008 (even though we both were into her platform, Cynthia’s running mate, Rosa Clemente, didn’t know the difference between Iraq and Iran and guys, that’s not good). So while it’s tempting for me to assume I’m preaching to the choir here at APW, I can’t be sure that it’s totally true.

I mean, yes of course, a lot of y’all are totally nodding along and echoing what I’m saying across your various channels. I knew this because we’ve gone deep in the comments on this and other posts, and I know from Happy Hour discussions that several of you plan to join in on our big, virtual clinking of made-from-100-percent-shattered-glass-ceiling champagne flutes the night of November 8. So you guys: YAAAAAAAAS, I love you. Never change.

But some of you? I don’t know, maybe you still want to vote for Gary, even though he doesn’t know what Aleppo is, has nothing in common with Bernie Sanders other than their race and sex, and doesn’t plan to do anything about climate change (and thinks minimum wage should be even lower than $7.25). Or maybe you still like Jill Stein, even though she panders to the vaccination and anti-vaccination communities equally, and has never held any kind of elected office. Maybe you still don’t believe that Obama and Hillary are basically the same candidate, except for where she’s a little more progressive than he is. To you, I ask: What questions do you still need answered? What are your lingering concerns? I want to know because I want myself and others (who feel so moved) to address them.

I want to know because this election is pretty scary, and we all need to be in it, together. Not for ourselves, not for our families, not for our moms and dads. For our neighbors, for our communities, for our cities and states. For people living in good conditions and bad, for people fighting racism and poverty, for people living across the country and people living next door.

You know, for our fellow Americans.

Stephanie Kaloi

Stephanie is a photographer, writer, and Ravenclaw living in California with her family. She is super into reading, road trips, and adopting animals on a whim. Forewarning: all correspondence will probably include a lot of punctuation and emoji (!!! 😊 🎉 🎉).

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  • CMT

    It really bothers me that people say they don’t like Hillary because she’s dishonest because if you actually do the fact-checking she’s one of the most honest presidential candidates of the last three elections. (See http://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/8/1/1555457/-Fact-Hillary-Clinton-Is-One-of-America-s-Most-Honest-Politicians-Trump-is-one-of-the-biggest-liars ) But that’s what decades of messaging from Republicans (and even Democrats) coupled with misogyny will do to your reputation. I voted yesterday and I am so ready for President HRC!

    • stephanie

      YES! I am in the middle of her book about her time as Secretary of State (after someone recommended it in Happy Hour!) and keep finding myself FLOORED by how much homework she does. I actually plan to seek out books written by other former Secretaries of State as well, because I never realized (before reading this) how little I actually know about the role.

      • InTheBurbs

        Good idea – and if you haven’t already – check out Madam Secretary – It’s brilliant…

        • Jessica

          Obsessed with that show. Also, I have a Madeleine Albright book on my shelf right now. After seeing her on Samantha Bee last night, I will be moving it into the “read next” pile

          • scw

            that segment was great!

          • Tonya Olson

            Madeleine Albright spoke at my college when I was a student. She is such a badass!

          • Alanna Cartier

            Ruth Bader Ginsberg’s is my next to read book.

        • Kayakgirl73

          Love that show. I’m behind on the new season — kids who won’t go to sleep. My husband loves the show too.

      • SLC

        I heard a talk by a female professor who’s an expert on terrorism and had worked with HRC. She said she was really impressed with HRC because she had never met anyone so determined to learn everything she could about the subject.

      • Alanna Cartier

        The book is great isn’t it? I thought I was informed and well-read and it floored me how much work actually goes into the role, and how much work she put into it. I was with HRC before I read it, and now even more so.

    • Totch

      I’ve gotten really tired of the “unlikeable” complaints, because I connect to Clinton pretty strongly as a person. If her being wonky and keen and better at listening than speaking make her unlikeable, then I guess a lot of people wouldn’t like me much either.

      I find her very relatable and likeable, and I definitely have a mix of general surprise and personal sadness over the way other people see her.

      • stephanie

        “If her being wonky and keen and better at listening than speaking make her unlikeable, then I guess a lot of people wouldn’t like me much either.” I very much relate to what you’re saying here, for similar reasons. I always say Hillary is very much a Hermione, and I relate a lot to both of them.. and they’re not always people that everyone likes.

        • A.

          Semi-tangential Harry Potter nerd rant, but ‘ve heard a lot that this election is like Hermione v. Draco and I take great umbrage (heh) with that because Draco was certainly vicious and bigoted, but he was also intelligent, complex and arguably conflicted.

          …This is more like Hermione v. Crabbe or Goyle.

          • stephanie

            TOTALLY agree!

          • Meg Keene

            LOLZ

          • BSM

            Or a dementor? Watching Trump definitely sucks all the joy out of me…

          • A.

            Again, somehow still too nuanced and interesting… ;)

          • Mary Jo TC

            If you gave a troll Malfoy’s hair and trust fund?

      • Meg Keene

        Starting at 12 years old I got the message that HRC was unlikeable to society, and that meant I was too. It was one of my formative feminist experiences.

        I decided I didn’t give a fuck if people liked me.

        • Totch

          Yeah, I’ve had to move through a lot of spaces with that assumption. But recently my boss was talking about how unlikeable he found Hillary, and that was hard.

          I’m a research manager. I’m on top of his HR and his finance and his ethics compliance. I plan data collection and speaking events, while also handling the emotional labor like office birthdays. I know which of our datasets include that survey he needs, and what he means when he asks about that one paper or who he forgot to email.

          Everything I do in my job, I do better because of personality traits I also see in Hillary Clinton. Everything I do to run this man’s lab furthers his career. What does it say that he finds her so unlikeable? That one really got me.

        • Heather

          Yes! To not giving a fuck if anyone likes me. The moment when I realized that I was never going to fit the mold of what was “acceptable” and “likable” therefore I should just be me and forge ahead was the most freeing moment of my life. Whether it be because I’m too opinionated, or the color of my skin, or the way I wear my hair , someone is always going to have an opinion but what matters is that I am comfortable in my existence & im NOT going anywhere like it or not. So I keep striving to learn more, listen more, write more, and be strong where I stand. Cause that moment in debate class in high school when I won not because I was popular but b/c I was well read on the topic and was aware of both sides of the debate was a defining moment for me.

      • Amy March

        I do not want to drink a beer with Hillary. But I will drink 3 bottles of rose with that woman any time.

        • stephanie

          yessssssssss

        • BSM

          I would drink watered down Franzia if it meant I could have a drink with HRC. Pick your poison, Madame President.

      • CMT

        Yup, same. And I actually do know that there are people who don’t like me for similar reasons. It’s mostly people I grew up with and went to high school with. I otherwise have very little reason to spend time with people who actively don’t like me now that I’m an adult.

      • Orangie

        Sigh, so I heard this week that someone I thought I had a good working relationship with thinks I’m “aggressive.” Looking back at my emails, I all I can figure out is…not enough exclamation points? I don’t say “Have a great day!!” often enough? Because I say please and thank-you and I never asked anyone to do anything that isn’t PART OF THEIR FUCKING JOB. Oops, there goes that aggression again. :) All of this to say, I am hardcore rooting for Hillary right now. I NEED her to win, so that I can wake up and come to work tomorrow with some hope that things are changing.

        • suchbrightlights

          I had a reference check come back the other day for one of my new direct reports who is starting next week. When asked “What could this employee have improved upon,” the reference wrote “Smile every day!” And I thought, “Sir, who are you to tell her to smile? I don’t give a FUCK if she smiles every day. I care that she comes in, kicks ass, and if she feels so inclined, takes names.” She can be a bitch. She can be aggressive. If she is those things, she will be welcome on my team, because BITCH is an acronym for Being In Total Control of Herself, and we are here to get things done.

          Rant over.

  • Amy March

    Usually articles I read about the election fail to capture all of the reasons I love Hillary, and I give them a pass because it’s a very long list, but Stephanie I think this really covers it!

    • stephanie

      Thank you!

    • BSM

      I agree. I really, really enjoyed how ebullient and unapologetic this post was. I can get a little cagey in my defense of Hillary (I wonder why…), but this came off really plainly joyful.

      Also, I am definitely going to cry when I cast my vote! And wear white! Can’t wait!

  • Megan

    Basically just wanted to say YES and thank you for this. And I’m glad I’m not the only one who bought the “made-from-100%-shattered-glass-ceiling” glasses. AGREE with all of this and proud to say I have ALREADY voted for Hillary (yay early voting in VA!).

    • Lisa

      My MIL gave them to me as a present along with a set of “Love Trumps Hate” buttons for my husband and me. She is the best.

    • stephanie

      I bought them the night she spoke at the DNC. :)

  • ART

    I. cannot. wait.

    Also, I had my training to be a poll worker this weekend, and I’m so impressed by what a huge effort an election is. It makes me so jazzed about voting in general. Since I won’t be able to wear any HRC-themed gear on election day (not within 100 feet of the polling place, if you please), I’ll have to try to wear out my Nasty Woman t-shirt in the week before. I’m sort of sad that I’ll be missing out on the clinking that night (I’ll be doing some of the zillions of chain-of-custody certifications and double checks that go into making sure the results aren’t compromised), I’m still excited to have a chance to participate in the process in a way that’s more civic duty-ish than partisan.

    • LikelyLaura

      Thank you for spending your time making sure people can vote. Very cool!

    • Emily

      Poll working can be a thankless job, so thank you in advance!

    • MC

      That’s so awesome that you’re volunteering – I want to do this the next election!!

      • ART

        Well, technically they’re paying me, but not a lot :) And I get a snazzy lapel pin. Do it! It’s fun.

      • ART

        And, depending on where you are, there might still be time to sign up if you’re available. Often they need more than they can get!

        • MC

          Unfortunately/fortunately, I already have self-care hot springs plans for election day. I know I’ll be so nervous that I need to be away from election news and the internet for most of the day. I”m guessing for the next elections I will feel a little less high-strung!

          • BSM

            My company is giving us election day off, and I have a day full of pampering planned :)

          • Lisa

            My university closes for election day, too! I’m thinking of making an election cake to celebrate.

          • Jessica

            This is so cool! Sending to my friend who has a mother loaf sour dough starter, then looking for some paleo cake recipes.

          • Lisa

            I don’t have any sourdough, but I’m going to substitute regular yeast and have fun with it! Now I just have to decide which fruit and alcohol combination to use…

          • BSM

            I’m wrapping up a Whole30 at the end of October, so Hillary + cake – work = the PERFECT election day. Thanks for the tip!

          • Lisa

            I think you should add + champagne (or sparkling cider), too! That is what I’ve decided we’ll be drinking all evening along with the cake. Obvs out of my HRC flutes. ;)

          • BSM

            Oh, you bet. My husband and I were joking that they should’ve also given us November 9th off because I am going to be so emotionally and physically exhausted (and probably hungover) after election day.

          • Lisa

            I asked my husband if I should consider taking Wednesday off, and he asked, “What for?” Um, so I can drink and watch election results roll in all night (and hopefully *knock on wood* celebrate)??

          • Ashlah

            I am working election day, but definitely taking Wednesday off! I’ve had it on the calendar for months, either for mourning or celebration, but the closer we get, the more (cautiously) confident I am it will be for the latter!

          • MC

            I’m taking the day off because otherwise I would be a nervous wreck sitting at work refreshing elections results all day even though I know that results wouldn’t be in until the evening! So I might as well fit some pampering in :)

          • ART

            That sounds…slightly more fun ;) enjoy!

    • JC

      Thanks for all your time and effort!

    • Jennifer

      Thank you for doing this! I wish I could but it’s waaaaaay too much people for me.

  • Danielle

    I’m voting for Hillary Clinton because, obviously, but am not a huge fan like some others here. Sure, my politicians don’t have to be perfect, but I don’t like the shady donations the Clinton Foundation has accepted, among other issues. Roxane Gay summarized it really well in the NYT last week, saying that Trump’s awfulness has kept us from asking real questions about Hillary: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/opinion/clinton-trump-third-debate-election-2016/the-unfunny-joke-of-donald-trump

    I hope there is room in feminism to question our female candidates. We don’t have to love them whole-heartedly.

    • stephanie

      Absolutely! Question everyone and everything, I’m here for that.

    • Amy March

      Wait, people haven’t been asking real questions about Hillary? That’s an absolutely absurd statement. Bernie certainly did, and millions of his supporters did throughout the campaign and still do. Trump certainly has. The media certainly has.

      Of course we don’t have to love our candidates whole heartedly. Of course there is room to question. But pretending like all of that hasn’t happened? Ridiculous. I don’t think Stephanie’s point was the Hillary is literally the best thing to happen to politics ever (although if it is, I TOTES agree) but really? Now? Question time is done. The election is in 15 days.

      • stephanie

        “Question time is done. The election is in 15 days.” PREACH.

      • A.

        Yeah, honestly HAHAHAHA to the idea that Hillary Clinton’s feet have never been held to the fire.

      • Danielle

        Question time is done? I hope not! I hope we continue to question our presidents, and all elected officials. That’s the essence of democracy.

        • Amy March

          Obviously referring to question time about questions that need to be ask during the election process, not for like all time. The article you linked to suggested that somehow not enough questions have been asked of Hillary in this campaign because Trump is so absurd, and that’s the part you pulled out that I think is completely demonstrably false. All the questions have been asked, loudly and often, and we miss out on nothing useful if Hillary spends the next 15 days contentedly sipping tea while people pepper Donald with questions.

      • Emily

        Dude, I don’t understand how any one could still be “on the fence”. THE ELECTION IS IN 15 DAYS!

    • Meg Keene

      People have been asking NOTHING but real questions about Hillary since I was 12 years old in 1992. The issue with HRC is that if you’ve been paying attention the facts are all on the table. And The Clinton Foundation is one of the most highly rated charities out there. I’m not saying it doesn’t have it’s flaws, it does, but mostly it’s been keeping people alive around the globe for a good long time now, thanks to AIDS medications, among other things.

      Female candidates get questioned about 10X as much as male candidates. The bottom line is that some of us who have been paying close attention for a long time LIKE Hillary. We know allllllllll the problems and issues (I have long had problems with her Iraq war vote, and you know what? I’ve made mistakes too), and we still like her a whole lot.

      • Danielle

        I feel like people ask fake, shitty questions about Hillary (and have since the beginning, like “Why did you go to work instead of staying home and baking cookies?” etc. I was around in 1992 too!)

        My real concerns are about her hawkishness and other political choices she has made. Sure, we all make mistakes. But, some of that squicks me out.

        She is a candidate I will vote for, and sure I’m excited about having the first female President.
        I don’t hold any higher expectations for her than any other politician. I’m just not all about the love, like many people here.

        • Meg Keene

          I share those concerns. I also love her.

          I also love Obama, and I think his drone policy and immigration policies are deplorable.

          • Danielle

            Got it. I just don’t *love* politicians, generally. The awful things they often do for their jobs precludes the love, for me.

          • Meg Keene

            I’m also in leadership, and so I know reality is messy, and I (have to) share qualities with other people in leadership. Running ANYTHING means making mistakes (often big ones), and having to constantly compromise for the bigger picture. I’m not a purist, I’m someone who wants the mess and compromise it takes to slowly push the ball forward.

    • MC

      I am a huge fan of her and I agree that we should always critique our leaders and hold them accountable, because no one’s perfect. I think the disconnect for me is that many male politicians who are also flawed, complex humans and leaders do not get near the amount of scrutiny or plain judgment as Hillary does. Two of the most beloved male politicians on the liberal side are Joe Biden and Barack Obama – Biden was notoriously sketchy and victim-blamey with Anita Hill during Clarence Thomas’s confirmation and has said many offensive or off-color things when speaking off the cuff. Obama, while doing amazing things as president, has also deported more folks than any other administration, increased drone strikes, and has bombed Yemen and has sold weapons to Saudis that are used against Yemen, all of which I do not support. Yet Obama’s approval ratings are higher than ever, and everyone jokes about they wish Obama could stay forever and Biden could be permanent VP. They are allowed to be both flawed and beloved in a way that Hillary is not. Which I think is partially why people that do like & love her feel the need to be so vocal about it, to try to balance the scales a bit.

      • Sarah E

        Yes, a million times. Men can be flawed and beloved, but women must be perfect to be liked.

      • Meg Keene

        YES YES YES YES YES YES YES. And you know what? I like Obama and Biden too, and I have all of the above issues with them. Because humans are flawed and imperfect and leadership is hard, and I expect our leaders to learn and grow (to put the progress in progressive if you will). But for some reason HRC needs to be perfect. Possibly because she has a vagina? Possibly because she’s the first.

        I never feel embarrassed loving Obama and Biden in public, and assume that people know I know they’re flawed. But with HRC, I always need to add a ***. I love her **** (**** I disagree with her on X. I feel like her vote on X was wrong. That time she said X in ’96, I disagreed, etc.)

        • Amy March

          I literally feel like I am evangelizing for her. Like I am bearing witness to the good news. Because so many people have said to me in person “I mean I guess so but no one really likes her.” False, middle aged white men of my social circle, false.

          • BSM

            Omg, I know. After every discussion of Hill with my husband, he compliments on my passionate sermon ;)

          • Meg Keene

            I need to give men props. David has loved Hillary longer and harder than almost any woman I know (for sure including me). I married a good one.

          • Meg Keene

            EXACTLY. Or they don’t know all the good shit. Lord, she went down trying to get us single payer healthcare, and I’m supposed to focus on the fact that she said a few shitty things about people her husband had affairs with? Look, I wish she hadn’t said them. I also probably would have said worse in that situation and regretted it, so better her than me. Now can we talk about her kick ass career instead?

          • Amy March

            Literally one dude said to me after her convention speech “I had no idea Hillary had done so many things in her life.” Yup. Even though I’ve only been telling you about them for months.

          • Meg Keene

            OMFG.

      • Danielle

        I hear what you’re saying. I guess there’s a difference between how the general public views those politicians, and how I do.

        Personally I am disgusted by how Joe Biden treated Anita Hill during those confirmation hearings, and really can’t look at him the same after seeing the Anita Hill documentary.

        In general I am not 100% supportive of any politician. They have a hard job and often do unsavory things in the process. I hope people can see my comment above in that context.

    • Mary Jo TC

      I agree, it’s ok to question female candidates and hold them to a high standard and feel conflicted about them and still be feminist. Especially if at the same time we point out sexist criticism of candidates from both parties. It’s clear that the Republicans gave Clinton a gift when they picked such a ridiculous candidate to oppose her. This would be a very different, much closer election with almost any other Republican. I liked the 2nd debate SNL opener, when Kate McKinnon said as Hillary: “Donald is very generous. Just Friday he handed me this election.”

    • CMT

      There’s been a lot of investigating into the Clinton Foundation so either you’re ignoring that, or you’re not looking for it very hard. Or you’re ignoring the stuff that you don’t believe.

    • Katharine Parker

      I feel you on a level of ambivalence about HRC. I think you’re slightly mischaracterizing Roxane Gay’s point though: “Hillary Clinton, a capable, intelligent woman is running against an unworthy opponent and we are so distracted by the putrescent carnival of his candidacy that there has been little opportunity to hold her feet to the fire on her hawkish foreign policy, and the other issues.”

      There is a difference between asking questions about Hillary and asking questions of her. This garbage election cycle has made the latter less possible (and HRC’s well-known hatred of the press doesn’t make it easier).

      • Danielle

        I did not mean to mischaracterize what Roxane Gay said. I just really liked that article, and the point that stood out to me was that it’s ok to criticize Hillary, and ask questions about her record, and this election has made that difficult.

        • Katharine Parker

          I get that–I wasn’t trying to drag you, just put a finer point on it. This article makes a similar point in a slightly different manner: http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/10/if-trump-werent-a-monster-clintons-speeches-would-matter.html

          I will say watching the Frontline about both candidates gave me more insight into HRC that made me like her a bit more. (Also, even more disgust at Trump.) I’m still disappointed in the state of the Democratic party that there wasn’t a robust pool of candidates for this cycle (the best we could do was Hill, Carcetti, and an old guy who isn’t a democrat?) and that there aren’t nearly enough good candidates in the pipeline.

          • Amy March

            Yes, the best we could do is Hillary Clinton, a former Senator and Secretary of State. To the extent the overall pool wasn’t greater- why would it be? She’s been an obvious front runner to anyone in the party for years, I can easily see that others may not have wanted to waste the capital and money challenging her.

          • Katharine Parker

            She was the obvious front runner in 2008, too, and lost to Obama. Bernie’s success was based at least in part on people who didn’t want HRC. Given her continued high negative ratings (which are not entirely sexism. It some of it sexism? Yes. But there are legitimate reasons not to support her that go beyond her gender) it isn’t impossible to think someone else could have given her a run for her money. The perceived support of the DNC for Hillary and the image that they had cleared the field for her did not endear her to people who were ambivalent. Bernie should never have done as well as he did, and that attests to Hillary’s weaknesses.

            A different problem, though, is a lack of good candidates. There are many more Republican governors than Democratic ones, and governors have a much better chance of election than senators. There are not enough good candidates coming up for eight years from now. Obama broke onto the national stage at the 2004 convention, but I don’t think anyone this year really did. The DNC needs to work on this.

          • lamarsh

            Not substantive, but I am here for the Carcetti reference. +1

          • Danielle

            Thanks for sharing that article; it’s interesting. I actually do see the value of keeping some political mechanisations private – some of what they do is secret and behind the scenes, necessarily so! I even liked how HRC described that in the 2nd debate, a la Lincoln’s dealings with racist politicians behind closed doors.

            And I don’t like how people HATE her so much – a lot of that *is* sexism.

            I’m surprised there isn’t much room to question some of her decisions in this forum. I really hope that changes once she wins! And yes, she better win; there’s just no decent alternative – at least, not in a world I want to live in.

  • CharlotteJ

    Love love love this article. Will be sharing everywhere, so excited to vote early and clink those champagne flutes with y’all (P.S. Any fellow Dallasites/Texans here? Think we can turn Texas blue this year??)

    • Kara

      I’m a Houstonian, and I’d love to see Texas go purple or blue. But I’m realistic, and there are far too many people in our state who will vote for Trump because they can’t vote for a non-Republican.

      • stephanie

        I was born in the south & still live here, and guyyysss I am so energized by all this energy coming from NC, GA, and TX. Power!

        • Kara

          I love to check http://fivethirtyeight.com/?ex_cid=2016-forecast multiple times a day to see my state polling to be more than 10% Hillary!

          It makes me a little hopeful.

          • Lisa

            My state went a whole percentage point up on Hillary in the past week! (Trump’s still pulling at ~95%, but I’ll take what I can get…)

          • Kara

            Same here. One small step at a time!

        • Erica G

          PAINT ‘EM BLUUUUEEE! This is my first time voting for a president in a swing state, it is honestly exciting to maybe make an impact! :D

          • Kara

            This is my first time voting, too!

        • Kat

          Fingers crossed for GA! My bf and I voted early on Saturday and I was so excited by the steady stream of voters in and out of the center while we were there. And I got teary eyed when the lady handed me my *I Voted* sticker because I’m just so humbled to have the opportunity to cast my vote for a strong, CAPABLE female candidate.

        • Eenie

          Georgia here! You would never know by the amount of trump signs in our neighborhood, but we did make the joint decision to not to put up a Clinton sign because we didn’t want to be targeted. Hopefully there’s more of us out there :)

      • CharlotteJ

        I think you’re probably right, but I did see this poll the other day that has Texas as a toss-up state! So I got unreasonably excited ;) http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/2016/president/2016_elections_electoral_college_map.html

        • Kara

          Hehehe I understand. I would love to see Texas embrace the future.

    • BSM

      I’m rooting for you, Texas! If you’re on Twitter, I recommend following Propane Jane (@docrocktex26). She’s based in Houston and puts together the most well-researched, eloquent, FRANK political tweetstorms. I <3 her.

      ETA: also, first day early voting up more than 50% from 2012 in Texas' five biggest counties…

      • CharlotteJ

        Thank you for the recommendation, I will absolutely follow her! As for early voting, I’m so proud of us!! Wish I could have been part of those numbers…I’ll be voting this Saturday! Planning to make a day of it :-)

  • Mary Jo TC

    Of all the newspapers in the country, over 180 have endorsed Clinton, and fewer than 10 have endorsed Trump. Even if you add together all the newspapers that haven’t endorsed her (Trump’s pitiful 9, the ones with no endorsement, the ones that just say “not Trump,” or “not Clinton” and the handful for Johnson), she still has over 3 times as many as that. Several that are traditionally Republican, that haven’t endorsed a Democrat in 50-100 years, have endorsed Clinton. Now, I follow current events and know where Aleppo is. But the people on these editorial boards are surely just as smart as I am, and they surely know more than I do about these issues because they have more time to study them because they’ve made politics their career. Generally, “follow the crowd” is not good advice, but I think in this case it really applies. To me, voting Trump at this point is an expression of extreme hubris. It’s like saying, “I know more than all these smart conservative newspaper editors who I generally agree with and who have had more time and context to study the issues than I do.”
    The people I see who are still undecided or voting third party or grudgingly voting Trump say it’s because:
    1) they’re really really concerned about abortion, basically single-issue “pro-life” voters who got excited when Trump picked Pence for VP
    2) They’re still hung up on the emails, or Benghazi, or the Clinton Foundation, or all 3. (OMG I’m so sick of this.)
    3) They want conservative Supreme Court justices.
    4) They’re afraid Hillary is too much of a ‘war-monger.’
    5) they hate both major candidates and want to “send a message” by voting 3rd party
    I think I’m going to try to early vote either this afternoon or tomorrow. I read that in my (red) state, women are dominating early voting.

    • Erica G

      Same! I voted Saturday and I really hope we can take NC!

    • Gina

      I heard the best response to the “conservative Supreme Court justices” argument on one of my fave podcasts (Pantsuit Politics, check it out!). It was basically, there is no precedent for believing that Trump would nominate conservative justices. All evidence points to him nominating justices who are antiestablishment populists, which doesn’t meld AT ALL with the conservative view of constitutional interpretation.

      ETA: Obviously that would be a response to someone who is voting for Trump based on the Supreme Court argument, not the 99% of the people on this site who aren’t voting for Trump.

    • BSM

      Pence… *shudders*

      • Lisa

        As someone who is originally from Indiana, I can tell you that most of us Hoosiers have similar reactions.

    • Loran

      For the number 1s out there, here is a piece that came out a little over a year ago when Canada was having our own election on how voting Conservative (in this context, read: Canadian Republican), is not the Christian thing to do, regardless of the stances on abortion or LGBT rights. For one-issue voters, it’s important to look at the whole and as Stephanie said, try to do the most good for the most people. I thought y’all might find it an interesting parallel:
      https://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2015/09/08/voting-conservative-not-the-christian-thing-to-do.html

      • Mary Jo TC

        Oh definitely. I’ve read Catholic nuns saying abortion foes aren’t so much “pro-life” as pro-birth, because they don’t also support affordable health care, education, child care, housing, gun control, abolishing the death penalty, etc, etc. Thanks for sharing!

  • CMT

    Why’d you change the headline? :(

  • emmers

    This is an aside, but the other day at work a colleague mentioned that she’d talked with her preschooler about the election, and her daughter couldn’t understand why there hadn’t been any girl presidents. She wanted to know why we don’t just alternate boy/girl/boy/girl, which I thought was awesome and sad at the same time.

  • NolaJael

    YES. As a PoliSci / lawyer / pro-government type, it really bothers me when politicians are scrutinized so harshly for DOING THEIR JOB. Yes, in our system they have to fund raise. It may seem unsavory, until you consider that if not, you’d have to be independently wealthy to run for local dog catcher. Yes, in our system politicians have to meet and work with members of the financial sector. You know why? Because it’s a huge part of our economy that needs to not burn down and take the US with it. In our system, with 24/7 media scrutiny politicians have to choose their words carefully. It doesn’t necessarily mean they are dead-souled ghouls.

    Perfection is neither attainable nor expected. So do your job! Compromise, give speeches, vote on stuff, write emails, change your position. That’s fine. Thanks for being out there in the arena, as Teddy would say.

    • chikzdigmohawkz

      ‘…it really bothers me when
      politicians are scrutinized so harshly for DOING THEIR JOB.’ Same.

      It irritates me when people bring up the fact that she’s a ‘career politician’ – if a pipe bursts, I’m not calling an accountant, I’m calling a career plumber; if I need surgery, I’m not going to go to an electrical engineer, I’m going to go to a career surgeon; and if a political office needs filling, I’m not going to vote for a failed businessman, I’m going to vote for a career politician. Because having extensive experience in the field means that she knows how to do the damn job.

      • Kat

        One of the things that’s really gotten to me this election is how the Fox News/Trump line seems to be “If you prepare, you’re a HUUUUGE loser.” It’s such a schoolyard bully situation. Why is she considered unlikable because she’s EXPERIENCED, she knows policy, she took the time to prepare for her debates….these are GREAT qualities that I’d want to see in any professional I’m looking to hire. I can’t wrap my mind around it. And as someone who is really proud of my academic accomplishments and my desire to learn, it makes it hard for me to keep a cool head when I talk to Trump supporters who use similar language. Especially family members. I almost feel….vilified? Because I read books and newspapers and study up on the things I’m passionate about? It’s been really disheartening.

  • MC

    Today I found myself contemplating if it would be possible to procure a brightly-colored pantsuit to wear on Election Day – might just have to settle for a snazzy blazer. Can’t wait!!!

    • BSM

      I was going to wear white to honor the suffragettes, but you have me reconsidering.

      • Jennifer

        This is actually something I can do. *makes mental note*

    • Jane

      That is such a fantastic suggestion. My suits aren’t as stylish as hers. I’ll have to up my game

    • Heather

      Yesssd! Great idea. I made a joke in my vows that my mom bought me my first suit when I was 12 so I could get to used to how it felt to be powerful both inside & out (sigh she was a great mom) so instead of day dreaming about my wedding as a teenager, I would dream about the pantsuits I would buy myself when I started working. His family looked at me kind of weird but my husband totally got it. I’ll be proudly wearing a pant suit on Election Day!

    • HRC BDAY
  • Jessica

    I just appreciate how calm and cool she’s been when any lesser person would have rolled their eyes and shouted “ARE YOU FUCKING KIDDING ME, AMERICA??” by now. I guess the closest she’s gotten is calling Trumpers a basket of deplorables.

    I’ve been on the HRC train since she announced her candidacy. Most of my social circle were Bernie supporters. I appreciate what Bernie stands for, stood for, and meant to people, but all I could see was the sexism of the system. A guy who could shout and have messy hair and not speak absolutely perfectly switches parties to run for president, and people rush to him saying how different he is while the woman who has worked for decades for that party, and understandably has a lot of support within the party, is being told that she represents the institution too much. I hated every minute of Bernie supporters tearing down Clinton for being a person who works hard–and yes, has made mistakes–without recognizing why something may be the way it is within a large bureaucratic organization or why she can’t shout and yell and have messy hair.

    • BSM

      Sooooo much head-nodding re: Bernie. Apparently he would never let the hair and makeup people touch his hair so that he could give off that outsider, I-don’t-care persona. Which of course is fine (everyone with any kind of public presence is trying to project an image that benefits them), but don’t tell me he’s not a politician, too, bros.

    • Jennifer

      Thank you for finally articulating what has been driving me NUTS about all my Bernie leaning friends (My bestie is literally not talking to me now because I’m voting for HRC and all I can say to her is BERNIE ISN’T IN THE RUNNING.). <3

      • Amy March

        Nothing more illustrative of male privilege than joining a club last minute, deciding you are qualified to run it, and complaining about the rules of the game when a woman who has been working towards running the club for 30-odd years wins.

        I don’t begrudge Bernie his candidacy, but I also refuse to pretend that part of it isn’t sexism.

        • Jennifer

          I don’t either! But he did concede. It’s more that this is such a polarizing issue that someone who stood next to me at my wedding is that upset with me over a difference of politics. (Also why I usually refuse to talk about politics with people).

  • BSM

    Looooving all this HRC love, but can I also throw in some major googley eyes for Tim Kaine? The way he vehemently defended abortion rights at the debate and his intro for Hillary in Pittsburgh the other day somewhat restored my faith in men. Here’s a version of what he said there on a recent podcast with David Axelrod (video here; it really is worth watching: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akfRGib3oAQ):

    “When Hillary asked me to be her running mate, what flashed through my mind was I’ve been in politics for 22 years; this is my ninth race. In all the previous eight races, I’ve been the guy with my name on the ballot, my name on the bumper sticker and the yard sign. And I’ve had all these strong women supporting me: campaign managers, Cabinet secretaries, agency heads; the voters that we get are more women than men.

    And I remember thinking, ‘Wow, I’m going to have the chance now to not be the top of the ticket. I’m going to be a strong man supporting the first strong woman to be president of the United States.’ And as important as it is to normalize that a woman can be president, it’s also important to normalize that strong men can support a woman as president.”

    • Mary Jo TC

      Wow. That’s really awesome. I didn’t see that, thanks for sharing.

    • JC

      He has also fully embraced the “America’s Stepdad” meme: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CvlGspVXEAAcO54.jpg

    • ItsyBit

      Is it getting dusty in here? No, just me?

      Seriously, thanks for sharing that quote. I hadn’t heard much about him but that alone makes me so happy.

    • Alanna Cartier

      I needed this. Thank you for sharing it. When trump supporters are joking about repealing women’s voting rights, it’s important to remember that Tim Kaines exist.

  • guest

    So I have been with her from the start of the primaries. BUT you are sort of glomming together several different e-mail situations here. The wikileaked e-mails have nothing to do with the Secretary of State e-mails. No one seems to care much about the wikileaked e-mails (nor should they). The Secretary of State e-mails people really really do seem to care about. I think people really oversell the issue. But it is still an issue – why would a woman who knew she would be running for president in 4 to 8 years do something so dumb? And why couldn’t she just apologize for it and move on? I will obviously will vote for her, and I will vote enthusiastically, but I do not think she has ever fully apologized for or explained what she did.

    • BSM

      I agree that she’s never really explained her reasoning for it (maybe it was just a really dumb thing to do and she has no explanation?), but she has definitely apologized and admitted it was wrong many, many times. I think at 2/3 debates she has apologized.

      • JC

        Yes, and they were real apologies, with no “if you were offended” or “if it looked bad” caveats. Many, many people could learn from her apologies.

    • Jennifer
      • ART

        That is a great piece, thanks for sharing! I work with quite a few federal agencies and frankly, it’s kind of a well-known joke that many federal government email/web interfaces are…let’s see, super old and janky? Yeah that about covers it. It completely does not surprise me that in 2009, her tech options from the state department would have been behind what a 2009-era Secretary of State would need, or at least want, to do her job. I wish she could find a better way to address this, like the article suggests. But not for my sake…I really DGAF!

  • Alexandra

    First: Whenever I see Hillary speak publicly, I kind of get heart-eyes. She reminds me of every badass female teacher I ever had growing up and in college; smart, well-prepared, doesn’t take any crap from anybody. I was crushing exceptionally hard during the debates. Something about a woman who knows what she’s talking about, doesn’t apologize for being alive, doesn’t ever qualify her statements with appeals for others to like her and approve of her, and doesn’t let anybody push her around or intimidate her…oh Hillary I love you so much.

    Second: I am nothing like Hillary. I WISH I were. I wish so hard. But I am not. This election is intimidating the crap out of me.

    I’m a highly religious conservative Christian so I do have people in my milieu, people I respect and love, who are rabidly against Clinton and are planning to vote for Trump. I’ve unfollowed so many people on facebook this election season. On facebook I posted a tribute to the Obamas, who I also adore, and was peppered with incredulous comments, every one of which I deleted immediately (not sure if that’s against facebook etiquette? I don’t feel like responding, just have no emotional energy for it. I like Obama. Voted for him twice. Think the Republicans have been behaving exceptionally poorly for quite some time. Don’t feel like discussing it.)

    My big issue is…how do I go about trying to see both sides? I have no intention of changing my mind, but how do I try to get into the headspace of somebody who believes differently from me and at least attempt to understand, instead of writing them off and frankly kind of hating them?

    This has been the thing I’ve been wrestling with for the whole election. I have started to get my head around how people see Hillary and tried to be sympathetic to their position instead of (honestly?) kind of wanting to slap them and scream “There’s no reason to hate her except deeply ingrained misogyny of the sort that has been intimidating me and other women for as long as I can remember! When you speak out against her, you’re speaking out against me, too, and every woman I’ve ever admired! Please shut up immediately!”

    I tend to see things in stark black and white tones. I’m working on it.

    • Amy March

      Well, you are like her in one big way. She is also a highly religious Christian.

      I’m not much of a one for understanding both sides in this case, or rather I feel I do understand both sides- one is bigoted, the other not so much so. For individual people I must deal with, I remind myself that people are ignorant, people are lazy, people are selfish, and people are thoughtless, and try not to ascribe negative motivations when passive refusal to understand might be more accurate. Don’t really succeed at it but worth a shot.

      • BSM

        One of my friends who is very progressive and happy to vote for HRC was telling me about how he’s really trying to learn about and practice empathy towards Trump supporters (the few he knows in real life and in general), but I just cannot and do not advocate for that. Until there is widespread, overwhelming recognition of and empathy for the people who would be seriously, dangerously affected by Trump’s and the GOP’s policies (people of color, women, LGBTQ folks, the disabled, the poor, immigrants, etc.), I am not. here. for. that.

      • Alexandra

        Re: She is a highly religious Christian…I KNOW! This fact makes me even crazier when my super conservative religious friends get to hatin’. She’s religious in the best possible way…lets it inform her personal behavior, understands the extreme complexity of various issues, doesn’t feel compelled to see the world in a dichotomy of believers and unbelievers us vs them foolishness…

        The majority of the talk among these folks is that it’s all about the supreme court justices, which also makes my head explode. Where’s the verse in the Bible where Jesus says the ends justify the means? We live in a representative democracy, not a theocracy head spinning words sputtering face palming I just have to get out of here…

        Because when this election is over, I’m still going to remember who said something snarky and asinine about all lives mattering and then hysterically pointing to the Supreme Court. And I don’t want to remember. I want to try to have empathy and compassion, even though I’ve never disagreed so profoundly about anything else before.

    • Lisa

      My MO has been to engage with people only who approach the conversation with a genuine sense of curiousity and willingness to understand, and then I disengage when civility leaves the discussion. I’m choosy about the discussions into which I enter in, and less picky about from which ones I opt out. I can sometimes understand a person’s head space and try to acknowledge that without conceding to their point, which does seem to help build a sense that we’re listening to one another even if we aren’t agreeing on the point.

    • A.

      This article helped me have a smidge more empathy. It’s from sort of a silly source, but it’s actually quite well-written.
      http://www.cracked.com/blog/6-reasons-trumps-rise-that-no-one-talks-about/

      Overall, though, my patience for those who actively support Trump’s promise of (what is essentially) white supremacy and the extent at which it would actively hurt and further endanger many of my closest loved ones and well beyond is why it’s only a small amid get. And that’s the just the beginning of my many problems with Trump and the callousness and/or hatefulness I see from many of his supporters, even the “good” ones. :-/

      • A.

        *small smidge, not small admid get

        And also meant is say my patience is thin

        Phone!

    • Sarah E

      Whether your debating skills are up to snuff or not, this Get Bullish article has great tips on how to deal with folks who are ridiculously wrong: http://www.getbullish.com/2016/06/bullish-qa-how-can-i-defend-feminist-ideas-if-im-terrible-at-arguing/

  • JC

    *Deep breath* Two more weeks. *Deep breath*
    My grandma, who was a badass genealogist and historian, bought me a book of short biographies of First Ladies that I read cover to cover many times. I certainly don’t have it memorized, but I once visited a museum in Boston and encountered a portrait of a First Lady that I would know anywhere, because I had studied her face for many years. (It was Frances Cleveland, and I wish I could say that I knew her name just by looking at the portrait, but that would be overestimating my skills.) Since this was the mid 90s, the final First Lady is HRC, in all her brilliant radiance. I identified so deeply with that book for many years. We can and should talk about her policies, her values, the systemic oppressions that she has both critiqued and contributed to, and I look forward to doing that for many years to come. But I’m voting to put her in another book for my kids to read some day!

  • Sarah

    Gary Johnson thought Aleppo was an acronym hence the confusion….but it’s pretty easy to get one soundbite and ride it out….

    • Amy March

      That’s a terrible defense of his confusion.

      • La’Marisa-Andrea

        Sometimes he doesn’t seem serious about his own campaign so yeah lol

    • MC

      He also couldn’t name a single foreign leader that he admired when asked – pretty sure he understood the question that time around.

      • ART

        “that, um, that Mexican president. whatever his name was. brain fart!”

    • annea

      He also has zero interest in working on actions addressing climate change or the general environment. Straight from his website: “..personal choices will do more to bring about environmental protection and restoration than will government regulations”… whoa there.

      He also has zero plan for addressing drug abuse, besides legalizing marijuana.

      He also believes “No Nation Building. No Policing the World. More Security Here at Home.” Can we think of some case studies where this would have been, or was inappropriate in history? WWII? I’m no history major, but this “plan” seems a little broad.

      citations: all http://www.johnsonweld.com

      • BSM

        He seriously said doing something about climate change is a waste of time/resources because the sun is going to explode and engulf the earth in a fiery abyss in a billion years.

        • Sarah E

          I mean, he’s not wrong about the second part. . .but with that reasoning, why do anything, ever?

          • BSM

            Exactly.

  • annea

    Reminder: Only 60% of people in this country vote, on a good year. That’s 2/5 people in this country NOT voting. WTF.

    If you have a friend/relative/acquaintance who wont be swayed by the presidential candidates (especially by this point) remind them to go VOTE for all those DOWN-TICKET seats, even if they skip or third-party the presidential election.

    • Lisa

      My state does off-year gubernatorial elections, and during the last one, something like 25% of eligible voters turned out. That’s 75% of people who sat and home and did nothing, while 25% elected the horrible asshat we have now! I’ve tried to convince some of my relatives who are ABC and hate Trump that they should at least vote for all of the other elected offices even if they can’t bring themselves to vote for president. Those down-ticket races often affect our daily lives more than who’s in the White House!

  • Jennifer

    As a disabled person (differently abled, I’m Deaf), thank you for mentioning us when you acknowledged all the minorities that are daily affected by how voting happens. It’s really really hard for me to worry about this election because I am already so marginalized as it is.

  • Maria

    I literally just bought white pants and a long-sleeved white shirt for Nov. 8. LET’S DO THIS!!!!!

  • Heather

    I’m a little late on reading this and responding but I did feeling the need to write and say I am 100% with you in solidarity. Thank you for taking the time to write this & basically articulate every single concern that keeps my husband and I awake at night. Because how anyone could watch this election cycle & not be terrified at where we are as a nation, is beyond me. How we seem to be taking 100 steps (years) backwards as a presidential candidate promotes every form of hateful divisive rhetoric…. I need to get some sleep but thank you, thank you , thank you for writing this

  • CII

    These past few months, I have not been able to stop thinking about this quote from a West Wing episode where Toby tells the President “Then make this election about smart, and not… Make it about engaged, and not. Qualified, and not. Make it about a heavyweight. You’re a heavyweight.” When I watched that episode for the first time (years ago), I thought “yes, that is exactly what a President should be, and what a qualified Presidential candidate should do.” What kills me is that is exactly what HRC has been doing — and she certainly has all of those qualities — and yet, there’s limited recognition of that.

    • Lisa

      I’ve been watching The West Wing for the second time in as many years because I needed to see aspirational politics instead of the muck we’re in. I’m tempted to fastforward to the last season and watch the comparative respect between the Santos and Vinick campaigns because, after this election cycle, they seem so damn civil to one another.

      • CII

        That’s such an interesting idea! I’ve been thinking of watching it again (completed re-watching maybe two years ago) but I’ve been concerned that it would just discourage me even more about real life.

        My husband and I have been watching the PBS series “The Contenders” which looks back at prior political campaigns and when the show discusses the the “nasty” tactics or statements employed in these prior campaigns, they seem so unimpressive because at least the candidates were (mostly) attacking each other on their positions on issues, and in (generally) civil discourse.

      • Eenie

        I strategically planned my WW rewatch. Currently in season 6.

        • Lisa

          I wish I had timed mine better!

  • Elaine

    Of course, Assange has reason to dislike HRC. She’s wanted to indict him for years just for doing the job we’ve all admired.

    I don’t really think he is guilty of rape or molestation. Both women say their encounters with him started as consensual and originally it was concluded that he wasn’t guilty of rape. It was later the case was reopened by a different attorney.

    • Amie Melnychuk

      I winced a little at this.

      Things can start out consensual, but as soon as consent is removed, at any point of “things” it becomes nonconsensual.

      See: Tea analogy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQbei5JGiT8

  • AGCourtney

    Ohhhh my god. I’ve been ignoring my dad’s attempts at starting political fights for months, but last night, he tried again, and I was like, eff it, let’s go. Apparently Clinton is going to be impeached because she covered up Benghazi. Sigh. Very excited for him to get his own apartment in a couple weeks.

  • Amie Melnychuk

    I came across the Science Debate’s survey to the candidates today:

    http://sciencedebate.org/20answers

    And wow, Jill and Hillary are wonderfully articulate and have plans to address all of the concerns raised by the group.

    Donald and Gary, not so much. Just a lot of run around, and run-on sentences not really outlining any plans.

    The ladies in this election really do their homework, which is something you would expect all candidates to do.

  • lover boy

    Clinton was elected in 2000 as the first female senator from New York, the only first lady ever to have sought elective office. Following the September 11 attacks, she voted to approve the war in Afghanistan. She also voted for the Iraq Resolution (a vote she later said she regretted). She took a leading role in investigating the health issues faced by 9/11 first responders. She voted against the Bush tax cuts. She was re-elected to the Senate in 2006. Running for president in 2008, she won far more delegates than any previous female candidate, but lost the Democratic nomination to Barack Obama.
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