15 Examples of Wedding Invitation Wording You Can Steal


General invitation guidelines for you to follow (or to break)

by Meg Keene, CEO & Editor-In-Chief

Figuring out your wedding invitation wording is all about figuring out what the rules are… and then figuring out how you want to strategically break them (kind of like all of wedding planning right?)

I mean, come up with wording that makes you and your partner happy, and causes minimal family stress. Because for whatever reason, family (being family) sometimes uses wedding invitation wording as a flashpoint to unpack allll the family drama.

15 examples of wedding invitation wording

In reality, wedding invitation wording is a place where you might want to get creative… but not TOO creative. No matter what beautiful form they come in (old fashioned post, email, on a balloon, sent by a flock of pigeons, unrolled as a poster) they still need to convey some basic information. Who are you? What are you doing? When and where are you doing it? How you share that information can express everything from your values, to the kind of wedding you’re going to have, to your artistic taste. But an invitation still is, in its most basic form, a simple means of passing along information. Nothing more, nothing less. (So tell your mom to calm down.)

Related: 35 Cheap (And Super Stylish) Wedding Invitations

Because of that, the conventional structure of wedding invitation wording samples can be a helpful starting point. Here is a general outline of how the wedding invitation often breaks down, with specific examples to follow.

what you want to put in your wedding invitation wording

wedding invitation wording graphic with flowers

The Host LinE: The first line of wedding invitation wording  is where you list who’s hosting the wedding, which is something of a philosophical question. In times past, the bride’s family always hosted (and paid for) the wedding. Thankfully, those days are done. Hosting the wedding is, in the end, a (mostly meaningless) honor that you get to choose how to pass out. Both (or all) your sets/singles of parents can be listed as hosts. If you have five sets of parents and you want to list them all—list them all. One set of parents might be listed as hosts. You can host the wedding yourself, in which case the lines are reversed “Terry and Renee invite you to…” or the host line is omitted entirely. You can also make the host line more general “Together with their families.”

There are two issues worth noting here. Firstly, no matter who says what in the course of guilting you, the host line on the wedding invitation isn’t for sale; it’s an honor that you should bestow in a way that makes you feel comfortable. Names are not listed in order of who paid more (or who paid at all). And secondly, this particular honor is generally only used for the living (since these people are, ostensibly, inviting you to a party). A common way to honor the dead is to alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Renee Smith, daughter of Beth Smith.”

Related: Five Tips To Get People To (Actually) RSVP To Your Wedding

The Invitation LinE: This is where you actually invite people. “The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service while “The pleasure of your company” is used to denote a secular one, though you can use any phrasing you want. This is where you actually ask people to join you, so feel free to set the tone with anything from “Invite you to share their joy as…” to “Want you to come party with us when…”

The NameS: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.

The Action LinE: What are you inviting people to share in? Traditionally, with the bride’s parent’s hosting, this line read something like “At the marriage of their daughter,” but your line might read “At the celebration of their marriage,” “As they exchange vows of love and commitment,” or “As they finally tie the knot.”

The InformatioN: This is the one line where I strongly advise you to stick to the basics, since you want people to actually come to this thing. Time, date, and location should all be listed (though the address does not have to be, assuming it’s otherwise easy to find).

The Party LinE: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory, and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow,” this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.

Related: The Feminist Guide To Addressing Wedding Invitations

For more specifics, we asked invitation expert (and no-nonsense none too traditional lady) Kimi Wert of Printable Press to provide some wedding invitation wording samples that vary from classic to whimsical.

Wedding Invitation Wording Examples In Various Styles

simple wedding invitation wording

sweet and simple wedding invitation wording

Together with their families
Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan
request the pleasure of your company
at the celebration of their marriage

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Dinner and dancing to follow

———

With great pleasure

Alexis Lee West
& Taylor Eliot Keegan

invite you to join them
at the celebration of their marriage

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Dinner and dancing to follow

———

The honor of your presence
is requested at the marriage of

Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Reception immediately to follow
The Boathouse
163 Greenwood Avenue

———

With great joy
you are invited to
celebrate the marriage of

Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Dinner, Dancing & Merriment to follow

———

Because you have shared in our lives
and supported our love, we

Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan

request the pleasure of your company
at our marriage

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Reception to immediately follow

classic wedding invitation wording

TRADITIONAL wedding invitation wording

Mom Name
Dad & Step-Mom Name

request the pleasure of your company
at the marriage of their daughter

Alexis Lee West
to
Taylor Eliot Keegan

son of
Other Mom Name and Step-Dad Name
Other Dad Name

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Dinner and dancing to follow

———

Mom Name and Dad Name
Other Mom Name and Step-Dad Name
Step-Mom Name and Other Dad Name

request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their children

Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Reception to follow

———

Mom Name and Dad Name
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Alexis Lee West
to
Taylor Eliot Keegan

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Reception to follow

———

Mom Name
invites you to share in the celebration
of the marriage of her daughter

Alexis Lee West
to
Taylor Eliot Keegan

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Dinner and dancing to follow

fun wedding invitation wording

fun wedding invitation wording

Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan

Are Gettin’ Hitched!
Please join us
For a celebration of love, friendship,
laughter, and family

Saturday, June 7, 2014
at 4:30 in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Fabulous food, fun, and festivities to follow

———

Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan

Invite you to join the fun
as they stand together
before family and friends
extending their friendship
to include the vows of marriage.

Saturday, June 7, 2014
at 4:30 in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Dinner, dancing, and merriment to follow

———

Girl met Girl.
For the rest of the story join

Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Dinner, Dancing & Merriment
It’s outside, so stiletto heels might be a problem!

———

Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan

are tying the knot!

Saturday, June 7, 2014
at four-thirty in the afternoon

The Prospect Pavilion
409 Ocean Parkway
Brooklyn, New York

Dinner, Dancing & Merriment to follow
Please bring an instrument if you have one

———

Because you have believed in them,
Celebrated with them,
Loved and encouraged them,

We, Ingrid West, Chad West, North West, Andrew Keegan, and Brad Keegan,
Invite you to join us in honoring our siblings

Alexis Lee West
and
Taylor Eliot Keegan

As they celebrate the beginning of their adventure together

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

Dinner and dancing immediately following ceremony
Bring your dancing shoes

———

Alexis “It’ll be a cold day in hell” West
and
Taylor “Not in a million years” Keegan

invite you to join them
as they swallow their words
and join in marriage

Saturday, the seventh of June
two thousand fourteen
at half past four in the afternoon

Frolicking and food immediately following ceremony

Share the good stuff and help the struggling out. HOW DID YOU Do Your Own Wedding Invitation Wording?

Meg Keene

Meg is the Founder and EIC of APW. She has written two best selling wedding books: A Practical Wedding and A Practical Wedding Planner. Meg has her BFA in Drama from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. She lives in Oakland, CA with her husband and two children. For more than you ever wanted to know about Meg, you can visit MegKeene.com. #NASTY

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  • M.

    Helpful!

    I put my husband’s name first on our invitation because of that bride-centricity we are all so used to in wedding planning. It wasn’t even that stark for us, but I wanted to give him a little nudge of visibility to everyone.

    Also, we did both of our last names, mostly because it seemed most natural, but also because we both have fairly common first names (me especially) and were using Glo evites. Thought we might as well make it abundantly clear just WHICH Megan was getting married. There are a lot of us!

    • Lauren from NH

      That’s nice of you! I got to be honest, I think I will just put my name first on everything because I am doing most of the work. There’s gotta be a few perks, ya know?

      • Sarah E

        My name is going first on the invitations and website for the same reason. If he wants his first, he can create the site/order the invites :-P

      • Meg Keene

        We were so totally egalitarian on everything wedding wise, but my name went first and that was just that.

        Thinking about it, not because I was doing most of the work (we were splitting it). But I do feel like I was taking most of the bullshit, particularly on the “Well I guess this is the last time you’ll ever use your last name” crap. So, whatever. LADIES FIRST. That I can stand by.

        • lady brett

          i put the spouse’s name first because it looked prettier that way (when it comes to type, i always advocate for looks over substance – it’s part of my job ;)

          • Stephanie B.

            My name was listed first entirely because it looked better in terms of typography and design (I work in publishing and think about typefaces A LOT).

        • TeaforTwo

          AMEN to “taking most of the bullshit.”

          My husband couldn’t understand when I would get stressed out about the wedding. I did do most of the work, but the stress was absolutely because I knew I would get 100% of the shade thrown, even when it was for calls he made, or from his family. Aaaaaand I did.

      • MC

        We traded off whose name went first, sometimes based on who was doing which task. His went first on the website, mine went first on the programs I made, etc. I think he went first of STDs and I went first on invites. I did put my name first on our return address labels because I wanted people to notice that I didn’t change my last name.

    • unitofraine

      We put his name first because with him first our initials spell “WE” which is adorable for a wedding and became our monogram. If I go first it’s “EW” … much less adorable. Besides, this way, all the spam gets addressed to the bride …. Wesley. Just adding a little diversity to someone’s database …

      • M.

        Aw, that is cute!

  • Lauren from NH

    Since I think this is a similar department, I did do all the wording on our wedding website. At first it was tough and then I got in the groove and borrowed from phrases from some of my favorite Etsy invites and RSVPs. I wanted it to come off playful and casual, like us and the reader are family already, but at the same time not offend my grandpa.

  • C_Gold

    I’m happy with how we did ours. They said, big across the top in all caps “Liz and Adam and getting married!” and then below it “and you better be there!”

    We put the basic info (date, location) below that, and then decided to print more on the back. (Why not use the back of an invitation, right?). We put more details about the ceremony and reception, along with our wedding website and instructions to RSVP there.

    It was straightforward, though… Feb 1st is Sunday and we’ve only had about 40% of our people RSVP so far. So we’ll see.

    • Meg Keene

      Um. Look. You can spend 500 hours perfecting your invitation wording, and basically nobody will RSVP. Nothing you can do as a human will help this problem.

  • Michelle

    Ours could definitely go under the irreverent grouping….

    Our first and last names
    invite you to join us at our wedding
    And witness our journey into marriage
    Toast to a lifetime of love, adventure, and biking to the ends of the earth

    Saturday July 19th, 2014
    Jefferson Park Lawn Bowling Club
    Seattle, WA

    Cocktails at 2
    Ceremony at 3
    Whiskey-fueled dance-off all night

    RSVP instructions

    Biking encouraged but not required

  • Kelsey

    We were pretty basic, but I loved our ‘host’ line, ‘Together with their proud and loving families…

    • Meg Keene

      <3 <3 <3

      WHATEVER I DON'T FEEL LIKE CRYING AT ALL.

  • Sarah E

    I have our wording drafted, though our invitations won’t be ordered until later this week or next. The challenge was limiting the number of lines when I need to include RSVP information, too. We aren’t doing response cards or info cards, so I want to make sure everyone has the appropriate email/phone numbers, plus our website address. It might end up clunky, but it just has to get the job done.

  • carolynprobably

    I recommend including the zipcode for the event as part of the address. It may undermine your visions of scripty goodness; but it can make entering the address into a GPS much easier.

    Folks (like me, cough, cough) who waits until she’s sitting in the car dressed and ready to go to realize that she never copied directions from the fancy wedding website and only really knows how to get there “in theory” will thank you.

  • Lauren from NH

    Question! Does the hosting line, if used to indicate one family is the host, kind of throw shade on the other? I am probably going to skip this all together for something more general, but this thought occurred to me.

    • Eh

      I have only seen this on one invitation (the “together with their families” line is much more common). In that case the bride’s parents were hosting the wedding and the groom had no contact with his family so it made sense.

    • enfp

      I didn’t use this wording, but I’ve gotten a few invites to family weddings where this wording was used (bride’s parents only on the host line). It wasn’t seen as throwing shade, because in their social scene, traditional weddings were the norm. Everyone expected that only the bride’s family would be on the hosting line (and also assumed the bride’s family was paying for the wedding). So I think this depends on the social context, and is a know your crowd kind of thing.

    • Ellen

      This is probably culturally and geographically varied, but my experience is that host lines don’t do that. I’ve gotten a couple of invitations in the last year with very traditional invitations, including “Mr. and Mrs. [Bride’s father’s first] [bride’s father’s last]” alone on the host line and didn’t think anything of it. If it were the groom’s folks instead, I might note it (because it’s both atypical these days and not traditional), but again, I’d just assume that the groom’s parents were hosting for whatever reason.

  • Nell

    Help! Still not sure how to add RSVP info. We want people to RSVP via our wedding website, which also has a 5-digit code that you need to get in.

    Should we (a) use the back of the invite (might cost more to print) or (b) insert a self-printed little slip of paper with the envelope or (c) try to squeeze it in on the front of the invite?

    • kate

      i’d vote for either (b) or (c) just because i feel like there might be a subset of people who don’t realize they need to flip the invite over. but also, you could include a line on the front along the lines of “see back for RSVP info!” to remedy that without having to put all the details if space is the main concern.

      ours will be a separate smaller card, but i think any of your options *could* work, so i’d go with what’s easiest really.

    • I’d vote for b since separate RSVP cards are so common anyway! I think it would get missed on the back of the invite anyway.

    • Nicole

      Our invitation was a single card (we sent electronically to 90% of people so cost wasn’t an issue, but it was all there). We had the same issue as you did. This is how we handled it:

    • jspe

      I just used Vistaprint business cards for the RSVP enclosure telling people not only the website…but by when! I realized the first version didn’t give a deadline. Doesn’t look as cool as the matching RSVP card, but they were $10 for 200 (I’m sure you could get some different/better deal if you were more into couponing. I decided my sanity was worth just ordering the damn things already.) If you’re online RSVPing for budget reasons, I found this helpful

    • Lisa

      Are you using AppyCouple? Our guests were able to either just request to be let into the web-site when they opened it (which automatically sent me an e-mail to confirm they were allowed to get in). We also sent out an invite to the web-site around the same time that we sent our paper invitations, welcoming people to the site and encouraging them to RSVP/look around. This allowed us to eliminate the need to print the 5 digit code on everything!

      • Nell

        Yes, we are using Appy Couple!

        That makes sense. We did do an e-save the date, so it wouldn’t be so hard to send them an email with a link to the website!

        • Lisa

          Loved AppyCouple! If you have the email addresses saved with their contact information in the guest list, you can actually just blast a direct email invite through the site to everyone on the list, and then they don’t need the code if they click the direct link in the email!

    • neighborhoodmap

      A note about putting it on the back of the invitation: We did that, and some people missed it completely. We fielded a surprisingly high number of calls/emails/texts along the lines of “how do I RSVP?”

  • Eh

    I think the most frustrating part of our wedding planning process was invitation wording (it was one of the few times I cried). I am very happy that APW provided an option for deceased parents since I had a hard time trying to figure out how to word our invitations, as excluding my mother was not something I wanted to do. (I do not recommend looking for options for invitation wording if you would like to include a deceased parent because you will either not find options or you will be told that dead people can’t host weddings therefore can’t be on invitations.)
    Another frustrating part was that neither of our fathers go by their legal names and my MIL prefers the short form of her name over her full first name. I know my father’s preference to be called by his common name (he does not respond to his legal name at all) but my husband decided that his father’s name should be his full middle name (he goes by a short form of his middle name) and that his mother’s name should be her full first name (which he wasn’t sure how to spell). I requested repeated that he check this with his parents before I ordered the digital proof (note: you only get a limited number of free revisions to your digital proofs – luckily we didn’t go over). In the end, they both decided to change their names to the short forms of the names they go by.

    Here is what our invitations looked like:

    You’re invited to
    THE WEDDING of
    [BRIDE’S NAME]
    daughter of [FATHER’S NAME] & the late [MOTHER’S NAME]
    & [GROOM’S NAME]
    son of [MOTHER’S NAME] & [FATHER’S NAME]
    [Date and time]
    [Ceremony Location and address]
    Reception @ [time]
    [Reception location and address]

  • Rose

    Oh, thank you so much for solving a problem I didn’t even know I had. I’m paying for half, her parents are paying for half, and my parents are hosting the reception, so it really does feel like our parents are helping host. But I do also feel like it’s our wedding, and pretty much all the guests are our people (our parents haven’t really contributed to the guest list, even though we’ve offered). Once I’d gotten as far as thinking about wording, that hosting line would have driven me insane. But some variation along “Together with their families” will be perfect.

  • We wanted to save money on enclosure cards so we put it all out there! (The blurred out line was our wedding website URL ver small/subtle.)

    • Hayley

      We did the same thing, to cut down on enclosures! Got a little squishy with the formal Catholic wording, but got all the necessary info on there.

  • We ended up DIYing our invitations and had SO much fun with the wording. I think we ruffled a few feathers with some of the nontraditional bits (but it certainly warned people of what was to come for wedding day. HA.)

    If anyone’s looking to do a here’s-our-story-in-the-space-of-an-invitation, here’s what we did: (erm, you can ignore the preschool-worthy sketches on the left and focus on the artist husband’s final rendition on the right?)

    • Nicole

      This is so awesome!

    • traschereau

      This is the BEST!

    • Eh

      Our invitations were in a similar style. What my MIL got out of it was that we were not having a formal wedding. We had only mentioned this a number of times (no real wedding party, no formal centre pieces – instead board games, civil ceremony, groom and best name in suits despite my FIL giving a lecture on how it is easier to get tuxes since that’s what everyone does these days). Something clicked with my MIL after seeing the invitations.

      People liked our invitations because they were different and I didn’t hear any negative comments.

    • This makes me smile, Briana! My husband and I co-designed our invites too and had a blast. :)

    • C_Gold

      These are amazing!

  • Ours were sweet and simple. We drew everything by hand (me), made the illustrations into vector files (husband), and then had the invites letterpressed, so I wanted to keep the text minimal. Some might balk that we didn’t use our full names or spell out numbers, but I feel it kept things unfussy…

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/anthimeria/9505586298/in/photostream/lightbox/

    It was one of our favourite wedding projects, and still makes me so happy to see our invite hanging over my desk!

    • oh I LOVE this. And what a good idea to save an invite! (I wish we would’ve done that!)

    • kate

      these are beeeauuuutiful! nice work!

    • *GASP* These are gorgeous! Oh how I wish I had that talent!

    • jspe

      dumb question: how does one write out lovely addresses? hire a friend with good handwriting?

      • kate

        i think if you’re not an awesome artist like Maria obviously is, you either hire someone, use script font and print them, or just be fine with regular ol’ non-artist handwriting. i opted for the last option and feel totally fine with it. (although it may be worth noting that our whole aesthetic for the stationary and the thing itself is pretty casual)

      • jspe: We were fortunate a calligrapher worked at our letterpress shop at a rate we could afford. Otherwise, I would have addressed them by hand with my sister’s help. I also toyed with the idea of taking a calligraphy class locally. I think enlisting a friend with nice handwriting is a great idea.

  • Jessica

    We were lucky in that my parents didn’t care about the host line. We did a accordion-fold invite that said:

    Hope you’re free
    October 4th, 2014
    [my first my last] & [his first his last]
    are getting married!
    [where & when]

    the next two pages had more details and the RSVP card was a tear-off postcard that was titled “Can We Get a Witness?”

    All stolen ideas from the internet/more creative people :)
    My brother is an illustrator and hand drew the graphics and lettering. He’s the best.

    • These are great, Jessica!

  • Vanessa

    I’m glad you didn’t include the practice of “Mr and Mrs Dad’s Name”. My younger brother’s invitations were phrased that was and I was SO MAD that my mom didn’t even get to have her own name on the invitation.

    • Vanessa

      Blerg. I meant: that *way :/

    • Meg Keene

      I CANNOT. I refuse to acknowledge that some things exist.

      • ruth

        It was so refreshing to see that Mrs His Name nonsense not even mentioned here! When I got married, this was SUCH a fight – we got so much flak for listing my mother’s full name, including from our invitation vendor! I am so glad we stuck to our guns. It’s really lovely to know – when it seems like you’re the only one bothered by some of these patriarchal chestnuts – that you’re not alone at all. So thanks APW!

    • TeaforTwo

      We did that, but only because my mother’s name wasn’t on the invitation (deceased) and my MIL preferred the more formal Mr. & Mrs. HisFirst TheirLast. She gets to pick what she’s called.

      I see a lot of rage about that particular tradition here, but to be honest, I’m not sure why it’s any worse than when women give up their last names. (Which, for the record, I also don’t like and didn’t even consider doing.)

  • SJ

    We went pretty simply: “You are cordially invited to the wedding of…” We had our first names and didn’t include last. My overly zen remark at that point was “Guys. Everyone knows who we are….” It sounds silly, but as soon as I saw the invitations, I knew. Where else was I going to find a brown bride with a ginger groom without having to change anything?? (Note, not ours but the sample).

    • SJ

      Have no idea if the photo linked or not. Disqus dislikes me.

    • Lauren from NH

      Daawww! I love it! They saw you two unicorns coming ;)

      • SJ

        I was floored.

  • Kate

    Our invitations were a little unusual. I designed and printed them on full size fancy paper (resume paper, actually) using fancy (free) fonts I downloaded. We sealed them with red sealing wax and used matching envelopes. We had an Anglican service.

    Our wording was like this:

    Together with their Families,
    Mr. and Mrs. [My dad’s first name] and [My mom’s first name] [My parent’s last name]
    and
    Mr. and Mrs. [His dad’s first name] and [His mom’s first name] [His parent’s last name]
    Kate [my last name]
    and
    Joel [his last name]
    request the honor and pleasure of your presence
    as they are joined together in Holy Matrimony
    at two o’clock in the afternoon, on the Fifth of November,
    in the year of Our Lord, Two Thousand and Eleven,
    at [Church Name]
    [Church Address]

    Dinner, dancing, and merriment to follow.

    The favor of your reply is requested by
    October 15 to [email] or [phone]

  • newyork22

    We had an unorthodox multiple venue situation and didn’t want to buy three sets of invitations, so we chose one card that had a travel theme and worded our invite so. This saved us a ton of headaches since each party had a different theme/feel anyway so lumping everything under the travel bucket streamlined the invitation situation.

    Please join us to celebrate the union of Kim and Ash
    at a Tri-Continental Launch Party

    NYC | June 5, 2014
    Germany | June 21, 2014
    Nepal | October 6, 2014

    The favor of your eRSVP is requested at:
    http://appycouple……….

  • Andrea

    +1 to Alexis West’s sibling North.

    We went pretty simple–and possibly cribbed from an earlier iteration of this thread? So, thanks, y’all!

    Together with their families
    Me MN LN and Him MN LN
    invite you to witness their vows and celebrate their marriage
    January 26, 2015 | three in the afternoon
    Venue | Address | City, State

    Food, drinks and merriment to follow

  • enfp

    Our wording: Together with their parents, dad & mom bride and dad & mom groom, ENFP and Mr. ENFP invite you to witness and celebrate their marriage. Wedding venue, location and time. Dinner, drinks and merriment to follow. For more information and to rsvp, please see weddingwebsite.com.

    One of the reasons I wanted to have a wedding was to have people witness the vows we were making to each other, and to have them do a community vow, so we felt it was important to include the witnessing, as well as the celebrating. We did name all four parents, though we just used first and last names (ie no Mr/Mrs/Dr/etc), which took up a lot of space but we had larger text based invites so it looked fine.

  • TeaforTwo

    I strongly suggest using last names somewhere on there: we recently received a Save the Date for a family friend’s wedding, and when I asked my BIL if he was going, he said “Oh, I figured those were my wife’s friends.”

    I know it SEEMS like everyone you’re inviting probably knows who you are and that you’re engaged and is waiting for their invitation, but the reality is that there are going to be parents’ friends and cousins you’ve lost touch with who know you are, but who don’t necessarily make the connection immediately when they get invited to Matt & Nat’s wedding.

    On ours, we included our middle names, because my husband is named after his father and I wanted to avoid any confusion. (Father’s middle initial in the host line, and couple’s first and middles lower down.)

    • SJ

      If we had a larger wedding I can totally see why last names would have been necessary. The only one who fussed at me about it was my grandmother. But our guest list was small and sweet.

    • I agree. And both myself and my wife are kind of “known” by our last names.

  • Alicia

    We definitely made some people less than happy by not including a host line (we are paying for the ENTIRE wedding ourselves, with the exception of my dress which my mom is buying – hint she wasn’t the one complaining) and by using my fiance’s so called “nick name” (Chris instead of Christopher – which he hates). But we love it and our trusted best friends love it and we couldn’t be happier so here it is:

    YOU are invited to witness and celebrate the marriage of:
    Alicia Lastname & Chris Lastname
    Date, Time
    Location
    Address
    Vows. Cocktails. Pizza. Dancing

    Also! we just used postcards as our RSVPs, saved us on printing, return envelopes and postage, so highly recommend!

  • Ellie Rockhill

    Both of our parents, or should I say all of our parents? Are out of the picture for one reason or another. It felt most appropriate to mention my husband stepdaughters in the invitations instead. Since really, it seemed like they were the ones “Giving permission” to anyone for this marriage to be happening.

  • orienteeringirl

    Oh…I stumbled on our wedding invitations just about two weeks after we were engaged. We won’t need to order them for about a year, but I love them so much I CAN’T WAIT! They’re so us, they fit in with our historic wedding venue perfectly. LOVE! The only problem is that they way they’re written, there’s not a natural place to mention hosts. I don’t think my parents will care that they’re not listed as hosts, but FMIL might…she’s already purposefully brought out another couples very traditional wedding invite that she received and make a BFD about admiring how beautiful the design was in front of the entire family, even though it was very clearly designed for a winter wedding and ours in in the summer, but whatevs. She’s definitely the one that’s going to give us trouble at every point where we break with convention though. Le sigh.

  • Amy

    Suggestions please!!

    We only want those who support us to come to our wedding. The snide remarkers, cynics and eye rollers can stay home (including our parents should they continue their juvenile behavior.)

    Does anyone have good wording for an invitation that says supporters only (without being offensive or directly saying stay home if you are not supportive)?

    • kate

      eh, i don’t think there’s really a way to say that on your invites. if there’s specific people you’re truly concerned about (e.g. your parents), have a personal conversation with them about what constitutes “supportive” on that day and if they can’t meet you there and you really can’t deal with them being otherwise, don’t invite them.

      maybe brainstorm some ways to deal if you’re willing/able (practice a few one-liners responses for unwelcome comments, have your besties/wedding party run interference or be on call for pick-me-ups if you need them etc), but bottom line is a certain amount of “feedback” is inevitable, whether because guests are truly snotty or just a little oblivious, so IMO either you are prepared to overlook/deal with it for the day because you love them enough or maybe they shouldn’t be coming.

    • Amy March

      You could try something like “please come share in our joy as we celebrate our marriage” to signal that you do want people to share in your happiness, but I don’t think there’s a way to have your invitations ensure unsupportive people don’t come except not inviting them.

  • Caroline

    I loved our wording:
    Please join us
    to celebrate the marriage of

    My Name
    daughter of
    my parents’ names

    and

    Husband’s name
    son of
    his parents’ names

    Sunday the tenth of August
    Two thousand and fourteen

    Corresponding to
    The fourteenth day of the Hebrew month of Av
    Five thousand seven hundred and seventy four

    Ceremony at eleven thirty in the morning

    address

    Lunch and dancing to follow

    • Frances

      This is so beautiful! Thank you so much for sharing. My dad has passed away, and with this wording I could still include his name on the invitation. All the things he’s been unable to be a part of has been so painful – I’ll definitely be doing this as a way to honor and remember him. I have tears in my eyes.

      Thank you thank you thank you!

  • Leigh Ann

    My wedding invitations are one of the things I agonized over most as we were planning last year. But, in the end, they also turned out to be one of my favorite things of it all!!!! (Even though I decided to spend only 1/3 as much and forgo the letterpress I wanted so desperately. Don’t regret that a bit.) The wording was a lot easier than picking the design/layout for me. It was chosen because my mom was hosting (and paying, btw.) However we didn’t want to list ONLY her because we did not want anyone to think we were purposefully excluding the rest of our parents to call them out for not paying. Lots of drama in the backstory. (So we used 1st person plural to imply more of us.)

    The Honor of Your Presence is Requested to Share in Our Joy As

    Bride First and Last Name
    and
    Groom First and Last Name

    are united in marriage

    SUNDAY <– Seriously people your wedding doesn't need to be on Saturday to be a great party!!!)
    The Twenty-Ninth of June
    2014
    At Five O'Clock in the Afternoon

    Address to Wedding Location (at my Alma Mater)

    Reception to follow at Restaurant with address
    [We included reception details on the invitation to save an extra enclosure card!]

    Then, our reply cards were even better!!!

    Please reply by the Fifth of June
    Name(s): _________________ <– Using Names WITH a line ensured that we got NO invitations back where people had forgotten to fill this out. I think sometimes people miss the traditional M____ cue. + We're teachers so it suited us. My sister used the same trick & it worked 100% for her, too. [Not that 100% of guests RSVPed, that's a story for a different day. But all the RSVPs had names.]

    ____ Joyfully accepts for ceremony and reception festivities
    ____ Delighted to attend the ceremony, unable to attend the reception
    ____ Regretfully declines, but sending best wishes

    [I had heard lots of stories of people who ended up paying for a lot of "no-shows" in their budget :-( So I carefully crafted this wording to minimize that. Several people only want to attend the "important" part, the ceremony! And, I get that. They could just indicate that up front. And then our "no" line was softened, so I don't think people were guilt tripped into saying yes, when they really couldn't come.]

    Then, in our thank you notes afterword, we used the line "Thank you for sharing in our joy." Which tied things up in a nice little circle for me. We also used the theme or "joy" for our photo album and our Christmas card this year. And, I suspect that in a few years when it's time for a baby announcement… I already know what it should say!!

    Side note: To go along with the fact that we know some people would only come to the church ceremony, and not the party, we had a receiving line with ONLY the two of us! (This made it move quickly.) But it was FAR AND AWAY our favorite part of the day. Getting to see and hug everyone just after being pronounced as married!!!! Then, we could also enjoy the reception without feeling like we had to "speak to everyone." Totally recommend this "mini" receiving line to everyone!

  • Cbrown

    Thoughts on wording for a post-wedding reception? We were married in Scotland where we live and most of my family wasn’t able to come (California). It’s super casual (community centre / local park / Mexican food) so I’m hoping to have a bit more fun with the invites.

    • kate

      I’d just use words along the lines of “invite you to celebrate our marriage” or “Invite you to join the funas we celebrate our union”
      there’s a lot of great examples here that you can just change slightly to indicate it’s party time! instead of serious ceremony time.

  • One of the great joys of using empapers is that you can fiddle with the language over and over again until you finally feel that it’s right. My wife and I didn’t use a “host” line so this invitation design was perfect for us.

  • Carlos

    I love fun so maybe that is why I like the fun style invitation. But all of them are lovely.

    http://www.gelinmagazasi.com/appliqued-sweetheart-tulle-over-satin-mermaid-wedding-dress-hsgs31007-tr.html

  • Another Meg

    We were inspired by a previous post on APW about wording. We had to get a little creative because we’d been legally married a year before the big wedding. Here’s our wording:

    Because you believed in them,
    celebrated with them,
    loved and encouraged them,
    Please join Another Meg and Smarty Pants
    as they celebrate the beginning
    of their adventures together
    at [time] on [date]
    [address]
    *Bring your dancing shoes*
    Dinner and dancing
    immediately following ceremony

    And then we included an info card with more details and a map of the park where the whole shebang happened.

  • Corinne Keel

    I was hoping some of these examples would include RSVP instructions. We are not planning on having mail-in RSVP cards and instead we want to give the choice of phone, email, or website RSVPs. It seems silly to include an extra card in the invitation to explain this—but I also don’t want too much clutter on the main invite. Thoughts?

    • kate

      there’s a little discussion below on a similar question from Nell – your best bet is probably to either find space for it on the front of the invite or include a separate card if there’s not space. putting it on the back of your invite is an option too, but there’s some chance of it being missed there.

  • Emily

    I know this is late, but can you help with wording for the RSVP cards? That’s where I’m running into trouble!

  • Ali

    Ours was fairly traditional but informal, just like our wedding. The “parents of” line was hard to figure out because we split the cost with my parents, but we didn’t want to ignore the non-monetary contributions that the rest of our families made

    [my full name]
    &
    [his full name]
    along with their families
    invite you to celebrate their marriage
    [date]
    [time]
    [location]
    feast and merriment to follow at [reception time/location]

  • Sarah H.

    Any suggestions on wording for a local reception invitation a month after the actual wedding has taken place (in another state)? Thanks!

  • Megan

    Ours were incredibly informal, but that was the theme of our wedding!

    Megan and Trey
    Like each other a lot
    So they are getting married
    They also like the beach a lot
    So the wedding is in [State]
    They also like you a lot
    So you should totally come
    [When and Where]
    Then, WE PARTY!

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  • longonstaying

    “With gratitude and joy, the Smith(bride’s last name) and Jones(groom’s last name) families invite you to celebrate the marriage of Emily Jeanette & Benjamin Joel on Saturday, July xx, 2015, at 4 pm, Community Church in Smalltown, Oregon. Reception to follow at Village Church, Smalltown, Oregon.”

    We loved starting with “with gratitude and joy”. We also loved how we chose to say: “The Smith and Jones families invite you”. I know it’s traditional, but I just didn’t love the idea of it being clear who is paying or who is paying the most in the invitation. Our parents all chipped in and so did we, and they all chipped in what they could (which varied, but was equally meaningful).
    Also, my parents are divorced and re-partnered, but in the re-partnering everyone kept their last names. That is a heck of a lot of last names to include on an invitation. Also, the way my parents’ marriages and my relationships with my stepparents work, my stepmom really should be named, but my stepdad less so (and wouldn’t have wanted to be), but I can’t name my dad and stepmom and then just my mom and not my stepdad… (any kids of divorced parents want to give an amen here?! and my parental units all really get along, so we’re pretty lucky).

    SO- Having “With gratitude and joy, the Smith and Jones families invite you” feels so perfect. My stepmom and stepdad are both included in the wider “Smith family”, even with different last names (as are my stepsiblings, who have an entirely different last name!). My fiance and I are also included in our families! We didn’t say “of their children” because we are also inviting, and our siblings are part of it, etc…

    I really didn’t expect wedding invite wording to be such a THING! But, I love our solution.

    Emily

  • Angie McHargue

    I totally loved my wording… we did:
    Ms. (My maiden Name) along with her son, (my sons name)
    and
    Mr. (my hubs to be name), along with his son, (his son’s name)
    invite you to join with them in the uniting of their family on
    date
    time
    place

  • Denise McKenna

    I broke the rules of only living folks in the host line. My Dad hung on to life until my husband and I were engaged. My Dad worked his whole life, truly had a joyful heart and was even partially footing the bill with the money he had earned and saved along with my Mom. There was crying .d debating but all parties with a vote agreed upon:

    With joyful hearts, Mom and the late Dad invite you to share in a celebration of love uniting their daughter

    Bride to Groom.

    Date, time, place.

    Dinner and dancing immediately following.

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  • Chris

    Sorry no formality here… If bride dad and mom are paying for the wedding then they are the hosts. Simple old world common sense. No need for hyphenated anything.

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  • Sandra Zagorin

    Is it rude that I didn’t include my fiance’s parents names on the invitation? My parents are paying for the wedding and so I put their names on the host line… and my fiance’s parents have not been very supportive of the wedding planning (i.e. destination, number of attendees, etc) plus they are divorced, so I thought it would be awkward. It just didn’t occur to me that they would be offended.

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