This Is One Way I Deal With Stress


I mean... it is the holidays

by Meg Keene, CEO & Editor-In-Chief

apw-x-rescue-remedy

rescue rememdy and i did my best coffee tumblr

I have anxiety.

Not like “sometimes I get tense” (though for years I thought that was the case). No. I have generalized anxiety disorder. GAD presents various ways for various people, but I’ve experienced everything from constant lung-crushing anxiety, to panic attacks, to crippling anxiety spikes out of the blue, to post-partum anxiety, to phobias, to extreme anxiety around specific topics (hey, money!).

No Shame Game

Though anxiety is a profoundly stigmatized topic in our culture, I have no particular shame about talking or treating my anxiety…. because hey. Some of us are just wired differently, and that’s totally okay.

While I’ve spent most of my life dealing with anxiety in various forms, I’ve only spent the last handful of years really working on self-care. After years of struggle, I’ve realized that I don’t have to try to struggle through my anxiety alone, and that there are a ton of resources available to help me out. So I use them all: I take meds, I go to therapy, I talk openly with friends and loved ones about anxiety, I recently tried hypnotherapy (which was awesome). And I also use alternative treatments… because when it comes to anxiety, I will enthusiastically embrace anything that works.

rescue remedy stress relief

Rescue Remedy to the…Rescue

So when Maddie came to me to ask if I wanted to write “about this stress relief product I’ve never heard of, Rescue?” I was delighted, because I’ve been using Rescue Remedy for more than a decade, and I love it. Rescue is an over-the-counter holistic stress solution that was developed over eighty years ago, whose sole purpose is to help you stay calm when you need it. And since it’s made from flower essences, it is both mild and non-habit forming.* But the bottom line? It’s always worked phenomenally well for me.

Early in November (not realizing what a profoundly stressful time this month would be for so many of us), I packed Rescue Remedy in my bag as I got ready to take an international trip involving five flights, as a phobic flyer. What I did not know is that my husband was about to unintentionally take my experiment up a notch by forgetting to pack the anti-anxiety meds I normally take for travel. CUE PANIC AND FREAK OUT. Leaving me with just a bottle of Rescue Remedy and baby cuddles to calm me.

So once we got past a terrified mini argument, I sprayed Rescue Remedy under my tongue at takeoff, the familiar taste and smell immediately grounding me. But when we hit the worst turbulence of my life off the coast of Canada in the middle of the night (fun time to forget meds!), and I took Rescue sleep aid in desperation, I was shocked to find that it really helped. The knife edge of my anxiety dulled, and… I went to sleep. Blessed, bumpy sleep.

Self-Care Is Not Just For Other People

I’ve written on and off about anxiety over the years on APW, because I think it’s important to talk about something stigmatized, without giving into shame. I think it’s important to model the fact that you can experience awful anxiety and panic attacks, and still go on to do big things with your life.

But most of all, I think it’s vitally important for women to model self-care for other women. Particularly when it comes to issues as stigmatized as mental health care, or just taking care of ourselves in stressful situations. Because if there is one thing society has taught me, it’s that I should just be able to power through. That I shouldn’t need childcare help, or a shoulder to cry on, or medication for anxiety, or a moment to take a time out, or any form of basic self-care. That I should be able to suck it up, and do it all (and get some sort of medal for refusing help).

And that’s a lie. Frankly, a lie the patriarchy has come up with to keep us down. (Because I’ve never seen men holding back on self-care, whether it’s poker nights or Sports Center or just getting a damn sitter already.)

rescue remedy stress relief

So this (incredibly stressful) holiday season, I’m going to be keeping my bottle of Rescue Remedy in my pocket. And in those moments where I need to ground myself, or take a five second time out, I’ll take it out, give myself a little spray… and breathe.

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This post was sponsored by Rescue, maker of the original Rescue Remedy. Rescue Remedy is a blend of five flower essences, specially formulated to help you mellow out during times of stress. The Rescue formula includes Rock Rose for confidence and composure, Impatiens for patience and tolerance, Clematis for focus and motivation, Star of Bethlehem for comfort and reassurance, and Cherry Plum for self-control and stability. Click here to find a local Rescue retailer near you (spoiler alert, you can totally get it on Amazon too).

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Meg Keene

Meg is the Founder and EIC of APW. She has written two best selling wedding books: A Practical Wedding and A Practical Wedding Planner. Meg has her BFA in Drama from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. She lives in Oakland, CA with her husband and two children. For more than you ever wanted to know about Meg, you can visit MegKeene.com.

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  • Violet

    I understand this is a sponsored post, and I don’t have any specific criticism for the company being advertised here. But I must say, this is a bit troubling. Especially in the wake of the FTC calling out the complete lack of any scientific evidence of homeopathic remedies and the recent recall of pediatric homeopathic products due to finding belladonna–a poison–in them (again, not made by this company, but still, no homeopathic substances are regulated by the FDA). If sucking on a fruit-flavored lozenge brings someone a sense of calm, that’s fine. Putting on my favorite sweatshirt does the same for me. But to put that in a piece about clinical anxiety seems to imply that self-soothing strategies (such as peppermint tea or listening to calming music, which is what the products hawked here are in line with, evidence-wise) seems a bit irresponsible.

    Meg, I know you know a lot about your condition, and you’ve been a great advocate for reducing stigma around mental health issues over the years. But I find it really troubling to take it that extra step and imply that a strategy you personally find calming is a treatment for anxiety, and somehow on par with female empowerment. The disclaimer at the bottom is nice, but frankly, it should be the first line in the piece, not a footnote.

    • Another Meg

      I had a similar reaction. I think, generally speaking, social sites like this should not be in the endorsement game for products that (claim to) treat medical conditions.

      • Meg Keene

        Rescue Remedy does not claim to treat medical conditions. It’s a “stress relief” product, much like a “tension tamer” tea you might get at CVS. I use it that way, and I love it.

        • Lorraine

          What aisle would Rescue Remedy be located in at CVS? I’ve never seen it, but then again I never knew it existed. I’ve heard of Dr. Bach though.

          • Maddie Eisenhart

            I haven’t seen it in CVS personally, but I found it at whole foods. I forget what aisle though, because whole foods is a black hole. :)

          • Lorraine

            I’d probably have to order online. I don’t have a Whole Foods. :(

          • Lorraine

            That said, the Rescue Remedy web site says it’s at CVS and other pharmacies. I’ll look for it in case it’s there.

        • Lauren

          Except you claim it treats anxiety: “I took Rescue sleep aid in desperation, I was shocked to find that it really helped. The knife edge of my anxiety dulled, and… I went to sleep”

          In promoting a “stress relief” product I think APW should have not brought anxiety into this at all and saved that for its own separate post.

          • Lorraine

            Is anxiety different from stress?

          • Violet

            Yes, clinical anxiety is different than stress. If this post had only discussed stress, I would’ve shrugged and just not commented. Bringing up a medical diagnosis but then saying the product is not about that medical diagnosis is where this changes things for me.

          • Lorraine

            Okay. Now I understand.

          • MrsRalphWaldo

            I think that the fact that it was noted that this helped when the anxiety medication was left at home also makes it seem like this is being advertised as a medical treatment for anxiety and not a tool for stress relief.

    • Heather

      You nailed everything about the problems with this post, Violet. And I completely agree that the disclaimer should be at the beginning of the piece, not at the end. It’s too important to leave it at the bottom.

    • aly windsor

      I didn’t get that Meg was implying that this is a treatment for anxiety. It sounded to me like she’s discussing it as just another *coping tool* for anxiety. I have GAD too, and I need all the coping tools I can get. Rescue Remedy is something I’ve never tried but would be willing to try based on Meg’s experience. There’s a lot of scientific evidence for the effectiveness of placebo in treating anxiety so whether it’s the placebo effect at work here or something else, if it works for Meg, I appreciate knowing that.

      • Bethany

        This was my take on it too. I don’t think Meg said anywhere that this product treats anxiety, just that is has helped calm her down in stressful situations.

        • Meg Keene

          Correct.

      • Lorraine

        I have taken Valarian for stress and anxiety. It was used in Europe since the 17th century and also helps with sleep. They also used it a lot i World War II for stress.

        http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/valerian

        • MrsRalphWaldo

          I for some reason read that as “I used it in Europe since the 17th century.” Had to do a double take!

          • Lorraine

            That’s okay. The other day I read “atheist” as “Atlantean”.

            I thought someone was saying her atheist husband was an Atlantean from Atlantis. I think I win the Fruitcake Prize here.

          • MrsRalphWaldo

            That was me :)

          • Lorraine

            It’s good to have company in the descent to madness. :)

    • Sarah E

      I think some of the issue is the word “homeopathic,” which is used to describe substances like you mention– those with trace amounts of a toxic substance– and which Meg used here to describe an alternative or holistic substance made entirely from benign ingredients.

      I’ll note that as a fellow informed consumer, the peppermint tea (though I think different herbal tea than peppermint) and calming music are, in fact, clinically show to reduce anxiety. So when you say the evidence is on par, you’re correct, though it seems you’re implying the evidence is slim, which I don’t think is the case.

      • Meg Keene

        Yeah, I think it’s important to differentiate “homeopathic” from “holistic” or “alternative”. They’re VERY different. I’m not particularly a fan of homeopathic (though if it’s safe and has a placebo effect, great). I’m a huge fan of herbal and non-western forms of medicine.

        I’d rather try things that might work that are not heavy drugs first. If it works (placebo or not, I don’t actually care why it works), and saves me taking drugs, hooray.

        • idkmybffjill

          Just in case, you use the word “homeopathic” in the article. I don’t have any opinions on this, I actually am about to go buy some… but just FYI – if you meant to use Holistic or Alternative instead.

          “Rescue is an over-the-counter homeopathic stress solution that was developed over eighty years ago, whose sole purpose is to help you stay calm when you need it.”

          • Maddie Eisenhart

            Thanks for catching. I changed the wording, so I’ll remove both our comments in a minute to avoid confusion.

          • idkmybffjill

            Sorry – not to harp on this, but just in case you didn’t see the below comment – the actual product says “Homeopathic” on the label.

            Again, this isn’t really that big of a deal to me either way – but Meg voiced a fair bit of concern re: homeopathic… so, maybe worth a tad more digging.

        • idkmybffjill

          Just a quick FYI, the product says “Homeopathic” on the label. Sorry to be repeating this everywhere. I bought some like… right now, based on this article.

          If you’re not particularly a fan of homeopathic…. heads up – this product is labeled that.

      • MrsRalphWaldo

        I think the concern is that while it says that the ingredients are holistic and benign, it’s not regulated in any way so there’s literally no way to know what’s in it.

    • Meg Keene

      I do not want to imply that anything other than medication and therapy is a treatment for clinical anxiety. In fact, I tried to be pretty clear about that. However, the placebo effect is VERY effective for anxiety (Actually my final word on the subject is that if something works to reduce my anxiety, that’s all that matters. I’d actually RATHER use something that’s herbal with a possible placebo effect first to see if it works, and if it doesn’t, use something like Ativan second. Ativan isn’t a placebo, and it knocks me OUT. It takes away my anxiety, and my ability to… drive.)

      So when it comes to anxiety, clinical or otherwise, I’m firmly in the camp that self soothing strategies are CRITICAL. In fact, I’ve done a lot of cognitive behavioral therapy with medical professionals around anxiety, and calming strategies are always first among the tools they teach. When you have anxiety, if your favorite sweatshirt helps, that’s a tool you use.

      Beyond that, I actually am a huge fan of herbal medicine and all sorts of alternative therapies. They work for me, and at the end of the day, that’s what I care about. (I’m a huge fan of the placebo effect, which is a whole other story. But if it works and does not involve me putting chemicals in my body, I am DOWN.) So I think use of herbs is a great tool. But no, it’s not medicine.

      TL:DR, if you have clinical anxiety, you probably need to think seriously about using long term on going medication. Beyond that, you need every coping and calming strategy that works, for your toolbox. RR has been a fantastic tool for me for 15+ years.

      FINAL FINAL word? I’m not a doctor. I actually just want to talk about how people are coping with their stress in a stressful season.

      • Violet

        Thanks for responding. If it’s not being advertised as a coping strategy for use in clinical anxiety, then even bringing up clinical anxiety is where it gets confusing. If you wanna chat about holiday stress, why not use that term, “stress,” which does not imply a medical condition? (These are rhetorical questions, obviously; you’re under no obligation to defend your writing and editing decisions. You already said your final word, and I respect that. I’m just saying this is where it starts to go off the rails for me personally, from “Oh hey, I like this!” to “You can use this, but I’m not a doctor, so don’t sue me.”)

        The placebo effect is well studied, and the evidence backs you up that if something works, it works. Sugar pills can change a number of biometric readings, certainly. I’ve had acupuncture, with great results. But it’s one thing to be willing to try all manner of things yourself because you want to, and another to recommend to other people that they spend their money on a specific branded product. To say it’s been around for 80 years is not an endorsement- bloodletting was used for thousands. It’s like when you guys were talking a lot about astrology for a while there- it’s interesting to you, and it’s a way to view the world, all fine. But if you’d included a specific astrologer’s website on an article about how you used to suffer from a specific medical disease, but this person helped you, that’s when I’d get squeamish.

        Non-doctors quickly get down the rabbit hole discussing things like this- you make a distinction between “herbal” and “chemical,” yet water is a chemical. So is table salt. When you say “chemical” I think you’re using the term to mean one thing, when it has different meanings depending on the context. See: the debate/confusion elsewhere on this thread about “holistic” vs “homeopathic.” It just gets above the pay grade of a social site, really, really fast. See also: Maddie having to quash vaccine stuff elsewhere on the thread.

        And yes, I acknowledge everyone has done a nice job tiptoeing around making outright health claims, all the while still essentially making health claims. Again, because I’m intentionally avoiding saying anything negative about this specific sponsor, I’ll point out that products like “Emergen-C” and “Airborne” are also not allowed to make health claims, and legally speaking, they don’t. Yet everyone knows how they are marketing themselves.

        • Meg Keene

          Rescue Remedy does not, and has never marketed themselves in any medical way. They are a STRESS RELIEF product, just like tea, or incense, or candles, or what have you. You’re reading things into this that are just not there. We’re not tiptoeing around anything, because that thing does not exist.

          Why did I bring up anxiety? Because I have it, and I talk about it, and to just say “oh sometimes I get stressed” would be a lie. That does NOT mean that products I use for stress relief or calming are medical products.

          This isn’t above our pay grade because it is NOT REMOTELY A MEDICAL PRODUCT, nor is it pretending to be, nor are we implying that it is. It’s the equivalent of a calming candle.

    • stephanie

      Since Rescue Remedy doesn’t claim to treat medical conditions, to me… using it is exactly the same as drinking any one of the 15 boxes of various teas I have in my cabinet, whether they’re for a sore throat or PMS or anxiety. It works, it’s not claiming to cure anything, and it makes me feel better.

    • toomanybooks

      My thoughts:
      “Spray? Blech”
      “Oh, pastilles? Hmm”
      “Oh, it’s homeopathic??? Noooo hard pass.”

      I never had experience with anything homeopathic and didn’t know what it was. Like many other people I assumed that it just meant “natural, alternative treatment.” Then I found out that homeopathy is the “treatment” of a disease or whatever affliction with smaller doses OF THAT THING or something that gives you the symptoms of that thing. Like, treating a disease with the same disease as if two wrongs make a right. Explaining it here because I had never looked into it on my own before hearing a detailed explanation of it on a podcast and I had no idea!!

      So, sure, I enjoy drinking an herbal tea or whatever to “calm me down” (I also have anxiety). But I immediately distrust anything that says it’s “homeopathic” now that I know what that means.

      • MrsRalphWaldo

        I didn’t actually know that’s what “homeopathic” means. I always assumed it was synonymous with “holistic”

      • idkmybffjill

        Huh! That’s interesting. The idea in itself isn’t enormously alarming to me just because….that’s how vaccines work. But I’m not buying vaccines at the grocery store and drinking them.

        Also – just for anyone else reading, the article has been updated – I believe that Rescue Remedy isn’t “homeopathic”

        • toomanybooks

          I double checked and looked it up on Amazon, where I saw a bigger picture of the product and it says “homeopathic” on the product.

          • idkmybffjill

            Perhaps the APW team might want to elaborate a little more then? There’s been some back and forth and I think their understanding is that it’s an herbal holistic remedy.

          • Maddie Eisenhart

            I think perhaps there is some confusion between the original development of homeopathy and its current use. According to homeopathyusa.org, they define homeopathy as “Homeopathy, or Homeopathic Medicine, is the practice of medicine that embraces a holistic, natural approach to the treatment of the sick.” Which is how I’ve always understood it (obviously I believe in traditional medicine, but I’m also down for natural remedies and placebos and anything that helps.)

            However, Wikipedia sites the history as “Homeopathy is a system of alternative medicine created in 1796 by Samuel Hahnemann, based on his doctrine of like cures like (similia similibus curentur), a claim that a substance that causes the symptoms of a disease in healthy people would cure similar symptoms in sick people.”

            Funnily, that definition is closer to modern medicine (as some have pointed out with vaccines) than the definition of homeopathy per their website.

            That said, I feel like we’re arguing semantics at the expense of the greater point here? This, to me, is really more about figuring out ways to cope and deal with stress, which can include holistic solutions.

          • idkmybffjill

            I mean, I literally just bought some. I don’t have a dog in this fight. But if the word, “homeopathic” is a problem – and Meg voiced her opposition to those types of remedies earlier in the comments, it’s probably worth knowing that Rescue Remedy has the word “homeopathic” on the packaging. ¯_(ツ)_/¯

          • Katharine Parker

            I went to the website, and they’re clearly touting it as homeopathic: “The claims for these products are based on traditional homeopathic practice.” And they link to an explanation of homeopathic dilution: http://www.nelsonsnaturalworld.com/en-us/us/homeopathic-dilution

          • idkmybffjill

            Hmm, this is confusing enough for me to cancel my order. Thanks for sharing!

          • Katharine Parker

            That wasn’t my intention (I have no dog in the pro/anti homeopathy fight), but the more you know!

          • idkmybffjill

            I was glad to get more information, so thanks for sharing!

          • A.

            Except that vaccines are proven and homeopathy is definitively not. Let’s please not seriously compare the two; frankly, that’s dangerous.

          • Maddie Eisenhart

            I am not, and would never. My point was that the tactical definition of homeopathy might not be so useful in modern context. But I *really* don’t want to invite a debate about vaccines here (disclaimer: I am decidedly pro, every creature in my home gets them). Because vaccines + internet = bad news and that’s not what this discussion was intended for. I would like to think, however, that we can have a rational conversation about natural remedies for everyday stuff without devolving into a debate about vaccinations. Like, sometimes I go to the gym when I’m stressed. I also got the flu vaccine last week. Not mutually exclusive!

          • Katharine Parker

            Yeah, vaccines are not equivalent to homeopathy, and suggesting that they are is ridiculous. Homeopathic definitely gets used as a synonym for alternative or holistic, but it’s a specific kind of alternative medicine and recognizing that difference can be important.

            (If we really want to get historical, the original vaccine for smallpox was not a tiny bit of smallpox. That was variolation–it was a dangerous method of immunizing, as you can imagine. Vaccination involved infection with cowpox, and it provided immunity for smallpox. Much less risky, as cowpox was not a deadly disease. The word vaccine comes from the latin for cow, vaccus. This is why if you have an old school physician they might refer to immunizations, not vaccinations, for everything that isn’t the actual smallpox vaccine.)

          • toomanybooks

            I’m all for anything that helps anyone deal with stress. I am pro vaccine and also pro alternative remedies. Whatever works! Even placebo affect. It’s all good, and I don’t mean to rain on anyone’s parade here! :) I just didn’t know what homeopathy was before, and the literal definition everywhere I can find (other than maybe its website? Hm) is about treating like with like. So I wanted to explain why I came to my conclusion about not using it because I figured other people might not know. If that doesn’t change their opinion and they are comfortable with that, I’m certainly not out to persuade them otherwise. Love you all! :)

        • A.

          I wouldn’t use a vaccine that hasn’t been evaluated by the FDA and gone through clinical trials, and neither would any medical doctor. Homeopathic remedies do not have even close to the same stringency. That’s the difference.

          • Maddie Eisenhart

            OK, guys, this is starting to veer off course. No one here is suggesting natural remedies as an alternative to traditional medicine. And I think splitting the hairs of what homeopathy is or isn’t, is causing more confusion than clarity. I’m going to ask that we table this particular thread for now.

          • idkmybffjill

            I literally don’t know why I care so much about this, but I guess I just enjoy clarifying.

            Meg said this in her comment: “Yeah, I think it’s important to differentiate “homeopathic” from “holistic” or “alternative”. They’re VERY different.”

            If Meg believes that they are in fact VERY different, it might be worth pointing out to her that this product labels itself “homeopathic”.

            Again, I just bought some cause Meg’s experience sounds good to me. I like alternative methods and don’t have any negative connotations with that word. But if Meg does, as she’s expressed…. well. This product is “homeopathic”.

          • idkmybffjill

            Oh… I know. Me neither. That’s what I meant by, “I’m not buying vaccines at the grocery store and drinking them.”

            I was reacting to this comment: “Like, treating a disease with the same disease as if two wrongs make a right”. Just in that…. in my incredibly basic understanding of vaccines that’s how they work? (Although maybe better put, enabling your body to prevent a virus by injecting a small dose of that virus)….

          • toomanybooks

            I’m going to reword my original comment because I think (this always happens with internet vs real life!) my tone came off a lot more harsh than I meant it!

          • idkmybffjill

            No need to do so on my account! I think this is an interesting discussion, but it appears is maybe more intense for others.

          • toomanybooks

            Oh, no, it’s not on your account, I just knocked out a comment without realizing how controversial it would be and decide to adjust it so it didn’t come across more aggressive than I meant it to! I mean, one can never fully control how something is conveyed once it’s out there and you don’t have the benefit of a real life conversation/tone/reactions, but I try because I respect the community here and the need for advertisers as well! It’s definitely not something that’s like, a crusade for me.

  • idkmybffjill

    I always thought this was for rescue dogs! Learn something new every day.

    • Kelly

      Me too! Our dog’s foster mom gave it to her the night we adopted her and she said it mellows them out so that the transition is less stressful. I had assumed the “rescue” in the name implied rescue animals. Learn something new every day!

      • idkmybffjill

        Exactly! Same!

    • Maddie Eisenhart

      HA. Though I think they do have pet products!

      • Lorraine

        According to their web site, they do have pet products.

    • Lawyerette510

      I’ve used it for myself and for nervous dogs!

    • aly windsor

      Yep — I used to work in a doggie daycare that used it to soothe nervous dogs.

    • Cellistec

      Yup, my mom has used the spray on her cats for years when they get wound up around new people or the vet. I never new it was for people too!

      • idkmybffjill

        Like, legit I thought that’s why it was called “rescue”, for the rescue pets!!

  • Jess

    Self-Care: I am currently sitting in a massage chair at an airport waiting for my manicure during a 3hr layover after a horrible emotional issue coinciding with Thanksgiving with my in-laws immediately followed by a business trip.

    I’m so ready to be home, but his is not a bad substitute.

    • idkmybffjill

      Oooh! Which airport has a nail salon? This is the best thing I’ve ever heard of, airport wise.

      • There are lots that have salons, like the XpressSpa chain. You can get massages, mani/pedis & more if you have a long layover!

        • idkmybffjill

          I have clearly got to get better at airports!

      • Vanessa

        SeaTac has a nice Butter London salon.

        • Jess

          I wish I flew in and out of SeaTac more! A friend of mine always went to Butter London when she got back from China for work.

      • emilyg25

        A lot of them do! Just keep careful track of your departure time. (I may or may not have once missed a flight because I got a pedicure.)

        • idkmybffjill

          Ha! Oh no!!

      • Jess

        Most big ones! Inside the little XPresSpa’s. Manicure w/ hand massage was $45. ($35 without) they have a rewards program too.

        I have a friend who always got one when she came back from working overseas, because she was stuck with long layovers.

      • Alyssa

        Seattle’s airport has a Butter Nail Salon! I haven’t been, but am always curious to go whenever I’m there/have a layover because their nail polishes are leaping bunny certified.

        • Vanessa

          It’s super nice and relaxing, and they use a quick dry top coat so you won’t ruin your manicure as soon as you have to hoist your bag into the overhead compartment.

  • aly windsor

    I started using a product called Calmaid last spring at the suggestion of a psychiatric nurse for my anxiety. It’s lavender oil in pill form, has been studied extensively and shown to be as effective as psych meds, and it worked wonders for me when the panic set in… until I realized my sudden, intractable constipation started at the same time. So that’s a huge bummer — especially because I figured this all out in the last few weeks when I needed the calming effects most. Ah well. Back to the “should I, should I not” take medication battle in my head. :(

    • MrsRalphWaldo

      Correct me if I’m wrong and being wildly too personal, but wouldn’t it potentially be better to take a laxative to help with constipation and continue taking the natural remedy that works for you than to take psychiatric medication that you don’t know will work for you?

      • aly windsor

        It’s a good point, my doc mentioned it, and I’m considering it. To get more personal, I have an eating disorder history (though I’ve been very much in recovery for many years) so laxatives make me nervous (even though I did not use them as part of my ED, just knew plenty who did). All of that said — it’s what I may end up doing.

        • Salla

          If you end up not wanting to go the laxative route, I’ve had success with prunes, if that might be less of an ED trigger.

        • thebluecastle

          Soooo this may be entirely too personal but I have celiac disease and one of my unpleasant reactions to accidentally consuming gluten is constipation. Might i suggest drinking kombucha and taking ginger pills occasionally? If pills are too triggering, ginger tea helps me as well its just not as strong. The GT’s Kombucha brand has a flavor called Trilogy that has ginger in it that I really like.

          • stephanie

            I almost suggested kombucha!

          • aly windsor

            I totally appreciate the rec, but… kombucha freaks me out. I admit I’ve never tried it. What’s it like?

          • Maddie Eisenhart

            As someone who has historically been afraid of kombucha as well, and has now had like three bottles to test (including one I bought in a desperate attempt to fight pregnancy nausea), I have learned that there is good kombucha and bad kombucha, and I don’t know how to tell the difference. :) I also don’t know why it’s good for you, I just really like making impulse purchases at the grocery store.

          • JLily

            Kombucha is ok by me, but I don’t notice any positive effects from it. But a coffee shop in my town also sells beer, wine, and kombucha on tap, and it is this beautiful pinkish color and they serve it in a pretty glass and I am so tempted to order it every time. Marketing geniuses.

          • Lisa

            I had my first kombucha at a coffee shop in Portland! I actually was surprised by how much I enjoyed it because I was really unsure to start. It was mildly citrus-y in flavor and was a nice light-green color.

          • stephanie

            There’s a regional brand near me called Harvest Roots, and one of theirs is pink and it is DELICIOUS. If that’s the brand, try it!

          • aly windsor

            Lol!

          • Eenie

            Sugar content varies wildly! I’ve found the GT brand with higher sugar tends to be the ones more people like. Once you get used to the taste, I actually like the lower sugar flavors (and my mom brews her own!!).

          • stephanie

            It’s super great for your digestive system, but there are totally AWFUL brands. The best thing you can do is just try different ones – my favorite is GT’s original brand (you can get it at Whole Foods/Earth Fare/etc) and a brand by a tea shop in Portland (Townshend’s, Clear Mind). Sean is a MUCH bigger kombucha person (he makes his own), but so far I mostly just like those two. It’s just a bubbly probiotic drink, but it makes my insides feel super nice.

          • Lorraine

            We keep Kefir around as a probiotic drink. I have been wondering how Hot Cocoa would taste if I made it with Kefir.

          • Amy March

            I continue to think of kombucha as rotten tea. Shudder.

          • A single sarah

            I bought senna tea because I liked the taste. And then realizedsenna is an herbal laxative. Maybe another option if you go all out herbal?

        • Following on from the prunes rec, consider porridge for breakfast, or cold oats. They helped me out when I was on codeine, and you can always add prunes and candied ginger to it (which would taste fabulous and christmassy, especially with a bit of cinnamon too).

        • Anon

          Have you tried magnesium? Also calms your nervous system, is a muscle relaxant AND MAKES YOU POO.

          • Vanessa

            No joke. Take it slow with the magnesium.

          • aly windsor

            Ha — I have in various forms. I have Natural Calm which after a while I just couldn’t deal with the taste. And I got it in pill form. Thanks for the reminder. I’ll go take some right now. :)

    • Lorraine

      Have you ever tried Valarian for anxiety? It definitely helps me.

      • stephanie

        My husband is also a big fan of Kava tea.

      • aly windsor

        I haven’t. Does it make you sleepy? That’s what I assumed it would do.

        • Lorraine

          No, it’s more like it relaxes you enough to sleep. So if you take it in the daytime because of stress, it won’t make you sleepy. It also helps your muscles to relax and I’ve taken it before doing strenuous work to prevent my muscles from being as sore.

          Also, cats love the stuff. You can grow it in your yard, but it will attract cats.

          • toomanybooks

            Oooh, good to know. Lately I’ve been tired enough to go to sleep but not relaxed enough if that makes sense

          • Lorraine

            I know that feeling and it’s awful.

          • emmers

            I like melatonin which does make me sleepy. I have a couple friends whose doctors have suggested it, which made me feel OK about it. I will say if you’re considering pregnancy, I’ve heard mixed things from OBGYNs about it (I guess there’s not much research?). In any case, melatonin sort of gives you a sleepy window. If you push through it to stay away you usually will, but it does make falling asleep in the actual window easier for me. I usually take some, read, and then go to sleep in about 15 minutes when I’m sleepy. I like the Trader Joe’s mint chewable kind. :) ETA, it sometimes give me very vivid dreams, so just something to know!

  • I am one of those people who used to be horrible at managing my stress, until it started to affect my health. I developed two different types of headaches and also injured my trapezius muscle, all stress-induced thanks to my PhD program.

    Since then, I’ve been much more focused on baking self-care & stress relief into my life when I need it. Right now I’m feeling a lot of stress because BabyPi is due to make her arrival any day now, and I don’t feel ready! So I’m leaning on friends & family, and giving myself the space to take breaks when I need to.

    • Another Meg

      What do you do? I mean, specifically, what works for you? Talking it out, baking (YUM), etc? I’m asking as an also-pregnant person who can’t take her anxiety meds until the little tenant is evicted…

      I used to exercise, but now it’s a good day when I can take a long walk. I’m not having any irregular baby-induced anxiety, but my general level is back up to pre-meds, which sucks.

      • Ha, great questions! I should have elaborated. My pre-pregnancy glass of wine is also out for me, so I’ve had to find new things.

        Right now I’m using:
        *A nice cup of tea or cocoa, and indulging in a book or Netflix binge
        *A walk, outdoor if the weather is decent, or inside at a mall or other enclosed space if not
        *Retail therapy – lately it’s been all the pretty things at Sephora since clothes shopping isn’t really an option right now
        *Knitting pretty things and giving them to friends as gifts, as knitting calms me

        • Another Meg

          Thank you for the pretty list! Lists warm my heart. :)

          I also find I’m drinking much more cocoa than before (calcium and stuff!) I’m having trouble getting out of the house (I work from home, which makes the anxiety and low-level depression harder sometimes), so maybe shopping for pretty earrings or eyeliner is a good incentive to get out and move.

          If my cats weren’t so batshit crazy for yarn, I would love to get better at knitting. C’est la vie.

      • aly windsor

        I fought going for years for all kinds of reasons but, and as cliche as it sounds, yoga has been my biggest anxiety-reliever. It’s the only thing that has ever shut up the constant anxiety chatter in my head. And even though my brain is quiet for an hour, it’s slower to reach peak chatter for days after. I should also mention I’m not a flexible person so I do not look like those super bendy people when I’m doing yoga but it turns out being “good” at it is not what quiets the mind. It’s the trying to not fall over or as my yoga teacher put it more eloquently “finding comfort in uncomfortable positions”. (I’ve tried meditation too, which I guess is supposed to do that but have never been successful at it.)

        • Lisa

          I think the thing that works for me about yoga vs. meditation is that my body has something to engage in and focus on instead of whirring around. I’m also horribly inflexible, but the challenge of relaxing into uncomfortable positions is really satisfying.

          • aly windsor

            Yes. Same.

          • idkmybffjill

            YES. I also really like being in a class setting with a teacher to lead me. Often my teacher will say things like, “acknowledge your thoughts as if they’re clouds, just floating by, you don’t have to give them attention”, which is something I’m seemingly unable to make myself do at home :).

          • Jess

            It’s the same with me and both yoga and swimming. There is no way to swim or do yoga if you are distracted by worry/stress/sadness. Swimming, your body gets out of sync and you splash more than you move forward. Yoga, you have to focus on controlling your body or you’ll fall over.

        • Alyssa

          I know a few people who consider yoga more of a “movement meditation”, and I think it can work better than plain ol’ sitting meditation sometimes (like for me, when my anxiety is particularly bad, I can’t just sit with my thoughts. No way).

          My yoga teacher once told our class during a balance pose “if you focus on your breath being smooth and calm, your body will follow.” I try to follow that advice whenever I can!

        • Another Meg

          THANK you for the reminder! I wanted to try prenatal yoga. I took a few classes about a year ago and liked it but never found the right studio for me. Signing up now to try a place close to home.

          • aly windsor

            You’re welcome! Finding the right studio/instructor is so key for me. I’ve tried a few classes that didn’t work because I was so distracted by the instructor’s personality or the vibe of my classmates. Just keep searching until you find a class where you’re comfortable.

      • I’m a bit late to this conversation, but wanted to mention that in addition to prenatal yoga I’ve been really liking acupuncture as a pregnant, stressed out person There’s a community acupuncture spot in my city (which makes it cheaper) and on Wednesday during my appt there were 3 other pregnant ladies. In the past I’ve gone for headaches but this time I just said “I’m stressed and anxious” and they have spots to balance you. It’s been a huge help and something I plan to keep up with.

    • Lisa

      OT, but that’s so exciting! For some reason I thought your due date was in the new year.

      • It’s 12/29, so as of today we could have a baby at any time! I’ve spent my entire pregnancy telling her that mommy & daddy need a tax deduction, so let’s hope she heard me and wants to make a December appearance!

        • Lisa

          I’ve had two Facebook friends birth preemies in the past week (one at 34 weeks and another at 31). I know yours wouldn’t technically be a preemie, but since things come in threes, perhaps you can be my third internet acquaintance to have an early baby! Come on, BabyPi!

          • stephanie

            Hey, I totally don’t want to derail the thread/your good intentions, but as the mom of a baby born at 31 weeks (which is no one’s ideal)… this is a strange comment to read, and I feel like I had to at least acknowledge that.

          • Lisa

            I completely understand that. The 31 week baby is doing extremely well, and the parents are posting updates continuously. I wouldn’t have made the comment if everyone wasn’t in good health.

          • stephanie

            Yeah, I think my reaction is to the idea that we might cheer on an early delivery. I’m a big fan of letting babies bake as long as possible. My son was also in great health in the NICU, but a number of things came to light in the next 4 years (and two are a direct result of being a preemie).

          • Lisa

            …maybe that concern should be directed towards @Jubilance:disqus then? I was trying to offer my support and excitement for her and her husband. I didn’t mean the comment as anything other than that.

        • Babiieeees!

          Awww, that was my due date last year! Baby arrived WELL into January despite my (mostly) tongue-in-cheek pleas to arrive before the new year. But I love him anyway. :)

    • Alyssa

      Solidarity on school-induced anxieties. I developed food allergies, perpetual eating-related stomachaches and insomnia during my Master’s program, all of which went away a few months after I graduated… I hope things mellow out for you as you finish your PhD!

      And otherwise, congrats on being a soon-to-be mom! Soaking up all the support and self-care you can seems incredibly important for this last month.

      • So the best cure for my issues was…quitting my PhD and leaving with my MS. I discovered that I didn’t really want a PhD but my perfectionism & desire to please folks wouldn’t allow me to admit that to myself, until I started manifesting physical symptoms. Leaving with my MS was the best decision I could have made :-)

  • ItsyBit

    I recently had the startling revelation that I, uh, don’t actually engage in self care. Whoops. I used to, I swear! But somehow, somewhere along the line I slowly dropped all the small, crafty, hobby-type things that I used to do for relaxation/restoration. Fun is important but different.

    Anyway. All this to say that it’s a thing I’m working on super hard right now. I used to crochet a lot, which I found really calming. It turns out there’s some research which suggests that crafting, for those of us who sort of lose ourselves in it, has a similar effect on the brain as meditation! Nifty, right? And now, I’m off to dig out my old crochet hooks and buy a skein of yarn.

    • toomanybooks

      Yeeeessssssss. I’m an artist too and I rarely work on personal projects because, well, I don’t have the assignment! But I’m going to use wedding crafts as an excuse for more projects to give me something to do during the colder weather… it gives me purpose and so much of the time when I come home from work, that’s exactly what I feel like I need (in a fun way, not in a clean the endless piles of clothes from the bedroom floor way).

      • idkmybffjill

        I handlettered our addresses on the envelopes for our invitations in water color and it was SO RELAXING (I also designed the invitations with my husband but that was a much faster/not particularly relaxing process).

    • idkmybffjill

      Ooh yes! I’ve heard that. The “Relaxation Effect” or something like that? Repetitive motion especially (like knitting/crocheting, anything where you’re repeating the same pattern).

      • ItsyBit

        Yes, exactly!

    • anachronismsarah

      A reason to craft/quilt/sew, as if I needed another one… I looove the feeling of losing myself in a creative pursuit and winding up with something that will improve my life or the life of a loved one, i.e. clothes that fit or quilts to snuggle under or an inexpensive dog bed… The tangible thing at the end of the road is huge for improving self-worth and banishing silly negativity so it’s been a big deal for me, but I don’t think I realized how much the process is as important as the results!

    • Lisa

      I’ve been cross-stitching again lately for friends and family, and I’ve realized just how much I love it. It’s also nice because then I don’t have to think of something to do with the finished product, but I get to (hopefully) make my loved ones happy with a gift.

      • I’ve been doing the same thing with knitting…and I’ve built up a great stash for when I need a gift at the last moment :-)

  • La’Marisa-Andrea

    Panic disorder. Klonopin is my drug of choice. And sometimes deep breathing and paper bags.

  • Anon bc reasons

    I live in a state where marijuana is legal for medicinal purposes. I have all the hallmarks of GAD (though it’s mild), and panic attacks run in my family down the matrilineal line.

    Anyway, after “somehow” discovering that smoking up helped me work through my panic attacks, I applied for a medical marijuana card. The doctor who gave me my card recommended I get this under the tongue spray that had a high ratio of CBD (the other chemical compound in marijuana) to THC. As I understand it, the CBD is more calming than THC (which is the chemical that makes you super duper stoned). Anyway, whenever I feel a panic attack coming on, I can discreetly pull this little bottle out of my purse and spray it under my tongue. It makes me feel a little wine drunk (more like wine tipsy) for about 10 minutes, which is instantly relaxing, allows me to focus on my breathing, and lifts the black fuzz from around my vision. Once that initial high wears off, even though the panic is still rumbling around in my gut, I’m much more focused and able to separate the panic from my reality and move on with my life.

    Weed might not be right for you and might not even be legal where you live, but it’s been a gamechanger for me, especially when my panic attacks had lasted up to 3 days.

    And for a non-medicated approach – my previous remedy was eating an apple while laying on the couch and watching episodes of Friends with French subtitles (the subtitles are something additional to focus on).

    • MC

      Oh that is really interesting about the spray. I’ve used recreational weed before and haven’t really found that it helps with my anxiety or stress but maybe I’ll look into the CBD split next time I’m in a rec legal state.

      • Anon bc reasons

        The ratio for my spray is 18:1 (CBD:THC) – the highest I could find in my local dispensary.

    • Ashlah

      My husband recently started using high CBD/low THC oil, and it’s been really beneficial for him and us. He’s always self-medicated his anxiety with weed, and I was not happy that he was high all the time. Finding something that helps with the anxiety, but doesn’t leave us feeling disconnected has been helpful. He’s been wanting to find a different way of ingesting it, though, and it’s not always easy to find the right concentrations in the oil, so I might suggest he look into the spray. Thank you for sharing your experience.

      • Anon bc reasons

        Glad to help. :)

        I hope your husband likes the spray. Also – at my dispensary, they recommended I also get a tootsie roll-like chew to try (same 18:1 CBD:THC ratio) – so if he doesn’t like the spray, that’s another option. I admit I haven’t tried the chew yet because the spray is working really well for me, but it’s there for whenever I need it.

    • La’Marisa-Andrea

      My sympathies re the panic attacks. I totally need know those 3 day panic attacks are like and have been hospitalized for it. I had never thought of weed though and I live in Ca!

  • toomanybooks

    I put off going to the doctor for treatment of my anxiety, among other things, for yeeeeeeaaars. Recently I finally decided to deal with that and I’m so glad I did. (Just in time for the colder weather, not to mention the election).

    I also try to keep a list of little things that make me happy so that when I’m feeling super not great I can try one of those. (Not that I always remember to do that.) Like a new book, a chai latte… sitting down with a nice big teacup of a new tea I’m trying… when I was in college my favorite way of dealing with my problems was putting on sad, wallowy music and lying in bed listening to it until I fell asleep. Then I’d wake up from my stress nap and I wouldn’t be stressing about that thing anymore. These days, not only can my body not handle naps but I’ve turned to cheerier Entertainment to brighten my mood or at least calm me down. It helps to choose a fluffy sitcom that has a million seasons and just watch it till I feel ok.

    • Her Lindsayship

      I have experienced the same change in dealing with stress! I used to get the saddest music I could find and just really sink into it, or I would journal about what was bothering me but that journal got *deep* and *bleak*. Now I watch Star Trek. Occasionally have a solo dance party. Very different strategies from me ten years ago!

  • Laura C

    I have been mainlining romance novels since the election. Well, not just romance, also Rainbow Rowell and Cassandra Clare. I’ve read nine novels in the past two weeks and two days, which is actually not that much except when you consider I have a job and a baby.

    I’m also keeping up my three times a week workout schedule, though frankly that’s been a little more of an effort lately.

    • idkmybffjill

      YES to romance novels after the election. I don’t know if this is technically “romance” but I’ve been doing the same with Harriet Evans! I hadn’t read much “chic-lit” in like… years, and I forgot how much I enjoy it!

    • MrsRalphWaldo

      I LOVE Cassandra Clare!

    • ruth

      As a genre fiction author myself (fantasy with some romance) this makes me so happy to hear :) At an Romance Writers of America conference I attended recently, the speaker was saying that “romance is the literature of hope” – I think that’s really true, and why it’s so important right now post election

      • Tashawevers

        Google is paying 97$ per hour! Work for few hours and have longer with friends & family! !mj376d:
        On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $8752 this last four weeks.. Its the most-financialy rewarding I’ve had.. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive if you don’t check it
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  • idkmybffjill

    Marginally related: Does anyone use “essential oils”? A college aquaintance of mine sells them and damned if they don’t look awesome. But I always feel a little weird about multi-level marketing style companies.

    Rescue Remedy’s website has a whole section about their comparison to them which is how this is related for me.

    • MrsRalphWaldo

      Some essential oils are GREAT and have proven results, others can actually be damaging to your health, so just make sure you do research into particular ones before you use!

      • idkmybffjill

        Ooh scary! I’ll probably stick with tea & vitamins!

        • MrsRalphWaldo

          I wouldn’t be scared of them entirely, just do a bit of digging before you take an advertised benefit at face value.

          ETA: http://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/explore-healing-practices/aromatherapy/are-essential-oils-safe

        • Sarah E

          Also, there’s a big difference in using them, say, in a homemade all-purpose cleaner to add antimicrobial power vs. in food (very very rarely recommended). Often their power is in the scent. Essential oils are basically highly highly concentrated forms of the plants they come from. From my understanding, it’s like if you took extra virgin olive oil and kept going a bunch more “extras”. The high concentration is why you only need a few drops for anything, and why caution is recommended in applying them directly to sensitive skin.

          • Lorraine

            So true. Some oils can be incredibly irritating to skin, yet be great for aroma therapy.

    • Sarah E

      Essential oils are incredibly useful in a lot of ways. I 100% agree with you about MLM companies. There are plenty of essential oils, which are generally of better quality, available via traditional retail. Look in Whole Foods or your favorite local health food store, and look for oils that are USDA certified organic. You can absolutely try essential oils without purchasing from an MLM company.

    • Lisa

      I’ve bought essential oils for homemade beauty products, but I get them through local grocery stores or Amazon. I don’t like the idea of supporting MLMs. (Yes, I’m aware Amazon has their own host of issues, too, but I have trouble with the fact that MLMs prey mostly on young women and can lead to individual financial issues.)

      • Anon For This

        I almost sold some products on Amazon once, but then I found out that Amazon can literally ruin a business owner because of their policies.

        They have this thing where they co-mingle products from different vendors. So if they pull stock from one vendor to fulfill another vendor’s order, and the product is defective, the innocent vendor gets in trouble! They can then refuse to sell your products and they give you a choice of having your products trashed or you paying a ton of money to have them reshipped to you. People have gone out of business because of this policy and have talked about it on YouTube.

        I’m not a fan of MLMs either, but they are mild compared to the potential trouble you can get into selling via Amazon.

        • Lisa

          I really don’t want to get into another side debate today. I try to buy my products as responsibly as I can and from larger companies instead of smaller sellers for just this reason. Amazon is obviously a double-edged sword, and I’m sorry I even brought it up.

          • Lorraine

            Understood.

          • idkmybffjill

            Rough day in the comments today. Let’s all have some tea!

          • Lisa

            Thanks. I just might have to do that.

          • idkmybffjill

            My work just got a bunch of fancy ones for Christmas and boy what a day!

          • Lisa

            I still have a bunch of the ones that my old boss always encouraged me to take from our catering table when I worked in Chicago. Most of the ones left are pretty fruity. Pomegranate counts as a winter flavor, right?

          • idkmybffjill

            Oh, absolutely.

    • MC

      Ugh I went to a party that ended up being a MLM essential oils sales pitch and it was really uncomfortable. I didn’t buy anything, and this particular company was selling essential oils that you put in your food, which sketched me out a bit considering there is no oversight from the FDA.

      I do have a lavender spray that I love & use in lieu of perfume (which gives me headaches). But I thin we just got it at Whole Foods.

    • Alyssa

      Yes! We’ve got a slew of them — eucalyptus, lavender, orange blossom and peppermint. I use lavender essential oil on my temples and collar bone before bed. Not sure if it helps, but I do like the smell. I also mix the oils with almond oil as a moisturizer when I get out of the shower, which is great too.

    • Vanessa

      I have a bunch of different essential oils that I use for room fragrance – for example I’ll drop a few drops of eucalyptus or lemon oil in the shower in the morning, or a drop of lavender oil on a cotton ball and put it in my pillowcase. But you don’t need to get caught up in a mlm scam for that, you can just get the at Whole Foods/internet.

      • idkmybffjill

        Good call!
        I like lavendar and eucalyptus a bunch.

    • anachronismsarah

      I love EOs in a diffuser for aromatherapy. Amazon has good ones, but I go to the food co-op and they are on the same aisle with my vitamins.

  • Katie

    You guys, can I just make one joke that popped into my head while I was reading this? I’m not being serious, I’m not trying to be insulting, but I just thought it was funny. We all try to be awesome capable independent feminists, yet we can’t even pack our own medication for travel and it’s somehow our husband’s fault that THEY forgot OUR medication. If that doesn’t summarize my life I don’t know what does. :):)

  • emmers

    For self care, I love hot baths, especially ones where I’ve gotten a good book from the library that I can (carefully, as to not dump it in!) read. I also love buying a new tasty kind of tea, and drinking it in a big ceramic mug (instead of my work travel mug), sometimes with honey or milk and sugar, for a special treat. I also love buying a new type of beer and trying it.

    Oh! And I’ve been taking my lunch hour most days to walk outside. It feels like the sunlight helps me be less anxious/worried. It might be a body thing.

    • Sarah

      Lol at not dropping library books in the bath.. I may or may not be guilty of this on a few occasions. Reading in the bath is the best!
      I also go for a walk on my lunch break most days. I hate our new office, and spending the whole day in there just makes me feel sad.

  • anachronismsarah

    I carried around the pastilles all through wedding planning, my hospital internship, and my last year of seminary, but have not tried the spray- and honestly, hadn’t thought about it in forever!
    It’s good to read such a great list of self-care practices… I think we could try to remember to bring back the self-care corner through the holidays during HH to keep each other accountable.
    I’m in bed with strep throat and a romance novel, and know I’ll need the reminder to take it slow once I get over this so I don’t wind up sick again. I think part of that balance will be walks and gardening, and time in the crafty half of our studio/guest room.
    The thing I am trying to do more of is write and communicate in ways that aren’t sermons and/or job-related… I think it’ll be good for me long-term to establish those practices, and I will have an excuse to make/send snail mail!

  • Thank you for reminding me about RR! I used it several years ago and it worked great for me. It’s very subtle, which I liked. I actually first discovered RR through a wholistic pet store. The animal version worked wonders for my anxious dog. I highly recommend that to people whose pets get nervous during storms, car rides, holiday parties, etc.

  • E.

    Haven’t heard of the spray before, but my moms put the pastilles in my stocking for christmas last year and they were such a huge help when work was rough!

  • Tashawevers

    Google is paying 97$ per hour! Work for few hours and have longer with friends & family! !mj376d:
    On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $8752 this last four weeks.. Its the most-financialy rewarding I’ve had.. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive if you don’t check it
    !mj376d:
    ➽➽
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